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PostPosted: Sat 02 Feb 2013 7:19 pm 
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Read here for some information about this resource.

viewtopic.php?f=28&t=1908

If anyone has used this resource, feel free to comment here. When someone is trying to decide which resource would best suit his/her needs, it can be useful to hear what others think.

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Beatha teanga í a labhairt.


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PostPosted: Sat 02 Feb 2013 8:59 pm 
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This is the best course for someone serious about learning Connemara Irish. :good:

The sound files are by Gaeltacht native speakers.

The explanations are reasonably detailed. It is quite heavy on grammar but by the time you get to the end you will have covered the main tenses and have a good starting vocabulary for reading newspapers, etc.

It is light on conversation. For that I'd recommend supplementing your studies with Buntús Cainte, which, although written in standard Irish, also uses native speakers for it's audio.

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WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Fri 12 Apr 2013 7:43 pm 
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I just saw a new edition (2013) of Learning Irish in the shops today. The big package with four cds has been replaced
by a single DVD, which also has revision exercises in it. I finally bought it myself in this new edition to learn Conamara grammar.

It's a fantastic book! Hundreds of very minor points of usage are covered over the course of the chapters, verb usage, the case system e.t.c.
It looks like it's geared toward people who love detail and grammatical explanations, so it might not suit everybody. Everything seems to be fully
in the Cois Fharraige dialect, so no worries about standardisation.

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The dialect I use is Munster Irish, particularly Cork Irish, so words or phrases I use might not be correct for other areas.:D

Ar sgáth a chéile a mhairid na daoine, lag agus láidir, uasal is íseal


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PostPosted: Sat 13 Apr 2013 6:44 am 
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I've just finished this book and feeling very proud of myself. It took me almost two years. I did all the exercises, sometimes twice over, and I also did the Nancy Stenson workbook exercises which accompany the chapters - a really valuable extra resource.
I absolutely love this book. I couldn't fault the presentation and explanations. Though you do have to like grammar, as others have said. Well, I do like grammar and it was perfect for me. The little articles following each grammar section are increasingly difficult, very varied, and range from everyday topics to newspaper-type material.
I love the Irish feel to the material too. You learn vocab about farming, churches, Mass, funerals and wakes as well as all the other stuff!
I was interested to see there is a new edition out. I got the previous one with four cds. I got two, actually, as the pages fell out of the book as soon as I got it, and the publishers kindly sent me another set. The pages fell out of that book too. Not to worry, I decided I could easily take one chapter at a time and study it on buses, in doctors' waiting rooms, in gym changing rooms etc etc.
I feel a bit lost now, as if I've lost my best friend. I have to face the world of Irish alone....am I up to it?


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PostPosted: Sat 13 Apr 2013 5:26 pm 
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nuala wrote:
I feel a bit lost now, as if I've lost my best friend. I have to face the world of Irish alone....am I up to it?
Ahem, ahem! You are not alone; you are part of the ILF community! :party:

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Beatha teanga í a labhairt.


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PostPosted: Sat 13 Apr 2013 10:11 pm 
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nuala wrote:
I feel a bit lost now, as if I've lost my best friend. I have to face the world of Irish alone....am I up to it?

You've got us here as Saoirse said. If you're looking for what to try next, why not have a go at Scothscéalta by Pádraig Ó Conaire.

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The dialect I use is Munster Irish, particularly Cork Irish, so words or phrases I use might not be correct for other areas.:D

Ar sgáth a chéile a mhairid na daoine, lag agus láidir, uasal is íseal


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PostPosted: Sun 14 Apr 2013 5:19 pm 
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An Lon Dubh wrote:
nuala wrote:
I feel a bit lost now, as if I've lost my best friend. I have to face the world of Irish alone....am I up to it?

You've got us here as Saoirse said. If you're looking for what to try next, why not have a go at Scothscéalta by Pádraig Ó Conaire.

That's an excellent suggestion. I have the Sáirséal - Ó Marcaigh edition (ISBN 0-86289-000-4) edited by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.

As a backup, all of the stories in Scothscéalta are also available in translation in "The Finest Stories of Padraic O Conaire"[sic], Poolbeg Press (ISBN 0-905169-54-9). ;)

I also recommend Buntús Cainte for reinforcement and conversation practice, although it is a bit more standardized.

There is also "Colloquial Irish" by Thomas Ihde, et al., (Routledge, ISBN13: 978-0-415-38130-7 (pack with CD)) for conversation which is in Cois Fhairrge dialect.

_________________

WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Mon 15 Apr 2013 5:08 am 
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Thanks for all your suggestions. I've got Scothscealta in my shopping basket so I'll order it soon. I'm trying to read a learners' novel at the moment. It's not in Cois Fharraige though - I am managing to understand it but I think in the long run it may cause me some confusion.


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PostPosted: Thu 18 Apr 2013 11:56 pm 
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Nuala - A friend of mine suggested this to you.

"What about Cainnt Ros Muc? That is many dialogues by
Conemarans with full translations and audio files and is the logical
next step. The audio files are free at
http://www.dias.ie/index.php?option=com ... 25&lang=en
- but you would have to buy the book, which comes in 2 hefty volumes,
one with the texts in, the other with the vocab. Both volumes are
needed - they cost 65 euros -and can be got from here:
http://books.dias.ie/index.php?main_pag ... ucts_id=79"

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___________________________________________________________

It is recommended that you always wait for three to agree on a translation.
I speak Connemara Irish, and my input will often reflect that.
I will do an mp3 file on request for short translations.

___________________________________________________________


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PostPosted: Fri 19 Apr 2013 1:29 am 
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Bríd Mhór wrote:
Nuala - A friend of mine suggested this to you.

"What about Cainnt Ros Muc? That is many dialogues by
Conemarans with full translations and audio files and is the logical
next step. The audio files are free at
http://www.dias.ie/index.php?option=com ... 25&lang=en
- but you would have to buy the book, which comes in 2 hefty volumes,
one with the texts in, the other with the vocab. Both volumes are
needed - they cost 65 euros -and can be got from here:
http://books.dias.ie/index.php?main_pag ... ucts_id=79"

Yes, that sounds like a great resource. Someone else mentioned it to me and I was going to investigate it further. Another excellent suggestion. :good: Thanks to your friend too, a Bhríd. :GRMA:

_________________

WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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