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PostPosted: Thu 28 Jun 2012 10:27 pm 
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Read here for some information about this resource.

viewtopic.php?f=36&t=1258

If anyone has used Rosetta Stone, feel free to comment here. When someone is trying to decide which resource would best suit his/her needs, it can be useful to hear what others think.

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Is foghlaimeoir mé. I am a learner. DEFINITELY wait for others to confirm and/or improve.
Beatha teanga í a labhairt.


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PostPosted: Thu 28 Jun 2012 10:53 pm 
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Location: Dublin, Ireland
Saoirse wrote:
Read here for some information about this resource.

viewtopic.php?f=36&t=1258
for l
If anyone has used Rosetta Stone, feel free to comment here. When someone is trying to decide which resource would best suit his/her needs, it can be useful to hear what others think.


A Shaoirse, a chara,

I have been using Rosetta Stone Level 1 for learning Irish in the past few months, combining with other text books as reference. I have actually finished level 1 only a few days ago. I was a complete beginner, and I had never received any Irish education before. I have to say that I find it quite useful.Below are what I think the advantages and downside:

1. The software is aimed at creating a pure Irish speaking environment, no English involved at all. It shows you photos of people or things, and will show you how to say things in Irish. Basically like children learning to speak. They hear what the adults say and imitate the pronunciation. However, it could create some problems because you do not actually see how they pronounce the words. So it was a bit difficult if you don't have any Irish. I had to use dictionaries to translate some of the sentences in the very beginning. But after a while, once you get use to the pattern, it will become easier.

2. Before you start the lesson, the software gives you an option for what you would like to focus on, reading, speaking, listening and writing. You can also choose how long you would like to finish the level, from 1 academic year to a couple of months.

3. All the voices for the recordings are in Connemara Irish (I think).

4. You will be able to download the course content as PDF as well as MP3. I find this very useful because I can listen to it while I'm on the go.

5. Level 1 is for absolute beginners. I think you should be able to download the content from their website and see if it suits you.

Hope this helps.

Go raibh maith agat!


Song


Last edited by Breandán on Fri 29 Jun 2012 12:46 am, edited 1 time in total.
Edit to fix error at beginner's request.


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PostPosted: Thu 28 Jun 2012 11:06 pm 
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Location: Dublin, Ireland
Sínis wrote:
Saoirse wrote:
Read here for some information about this resource.

viewtopic.php?f=36&t=1258
for l
If anyone has used Rosetta Stone, feel free to comment here. When someone is trying to decide which resource would best suit his/her needs, it can be useful to hear what others think.


A Fhoghlaimeoir, a chara,

I have been using Rosetta Stone Level 1 for learning Irish in the past few months, combining with other text books as reference. I have actually finished level 1 only a few days ago. I was a complete


A Shaoirse,

Tá bron orm! Got your name wrong in the last post. Don't know how to edit it. Sorry!

Song


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PostPosted: Fri 29 Jun 2012 12:40 am 
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Mr./Mrs/Ms. Song, just a note to say that you will have to make a ten posts before you can edit your past posts.

However, you are making a nice contribution by asking us interesting questions already and it won't take you long to reach your goal.

After that you become a fully registered member and will be able to add a signature and avatar, if you want to. :D

We only have one rank here. Everyone is a Foghlaimeoir (learner) because no matter how proficient you get at a language there is always something more to learn, even for native speakers.

In the meantime, if you need anything changed just contact a mod or make the request in a post. I'll fix this one for you above (but I am sure Saoirse understood, as many beginners often make the same mustake. ;) )

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WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Fri 29 Jun 2012 9:43 am 
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Sínis wrote:
A Shaoirse,

Tá bron orm! Got your name wrong in the last post. Don't know how to edit it. Sorry!
Actually it wasn't a problem as I thought you were just addressing any learner that might read your contribution; in fact, I thought it was quite a nice way for you to begin a post! Welcome to ILF!

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Is foghlaimeoir mé. I am a learner. DEFINITELY wait for others to confirm and/or improve.
Beatha teanga í a labhairt.


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PostPosted: Fri 29 Jun 2012 9:46 am 
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Breandán wrote:
Mr./Mrs/Ms. Song, just a note to say that you will have to make a ten posts before you can edit your past posts.)


A Bhreandán,

GRMA le haghaidh an t-eolas. Tá se deas liom bualadh leat!

Song Chen is ainm dom. Rugadh me agus tógadh me sa tSin, ach táim i mo chonaí in Éirinn le timpeal deich mbliana, i mbaile átha cliath. Tá staidéar a dhéanamh agam ar an nGaeilge ar feadh leath na bliana. Már sílim go bhfuil me anseo fada go leor agus is maith liom an teanga. Doigh liom go bhfuil sé an trua go bhfuil nach labhraíonn a lán daoine an Gaeilge fiú anseo in Éirinn.

PS: Is fear me. :)

Slán!

Song


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PostPosted: Fri 29 Jun 2012 9:49 am 
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Sínis wrote:
Doigh liom go bhfuil sé an trua go bhfuil nach labhraíonn a lán daoine an Gaeilge fiú anseo in Éirinn.
Is mór an trua é. :(

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Is foghlaimeoir mé. I am a learner. DEFINITELY wait for others to confirm and/or improve.
Beatha teanga í a labhairt.


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PostPosted: Fri 29 Jun 2012 2:27 pm 
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Location: Santa Cruz Mountains, California, USA
Unless they've changed it since we reviewed it at the old place, Rosetta Stone uses a Munster pronunciation, though not a pure Munster dialect.

I've not used it personally, but based on the many (often frustrated) questions we used to get about it at the other place, and on my daughter's experience with Rosetta Stone for Japanese, I have strong reservations about it (especially given the price) and would consider it, at best, to be a learning aid rather than a full-on teaching program. The advertising stresses the idea of learning a language in the same manner as a child learns his first language, but the reality is that adults aren't wired that way -- they really do need to know the "hows" and "whys" when learning a new language.

What my daughter found useful about the Japanese program is it did help with her pronunciation, and with making an automatic link between an image and the words describing it (we bought it for her when her Japanese class at school was dropped due to funding issues...she'd had about a year of Japanese instruction before that), but she also found it frustrating in many ways (particularly the lack of explanations regarding grammar).

From what I've seen, there are programs out there that will do what Rosetta Stone does at a fraction of the price.

Redwolf


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PostPosted: Wed 04 Jul 2012 4:52 pm 
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Rosetta Stone, currently, is my primary tool for learning Irish. I don't have much money for books and things, and I lucked out in getting a copy of Rosetta Stone Irish for free.

If you don't have anything else, it's better than nothing. If you're an organic learner, it's probably wonderful. As Sínis said, it offers a purely Irish environment, similar to that you would experience if you were a child learning your native tongue for the first time.

I'm not an organic learner. Even in English, my native language, I own more books on grammar and language use than anyone probably needs. I like knowing the grammar as I learn the words. If I can sit there and read a chapter on the proper use of the semicolon or how the passive voice can change the tone of a sentence in English, I want to know just as much about it all in Irish. Hell, even after using Rosetta Stone for a bit I still can't string together a sentence beyond the realm of "The boy eats".

I do agree that is it wonderful for pronunciation, though. If anything that's why I keep dragging myself along with it: better understanding of pronunciation.


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PostPosted: Wed 04 Jul 2012 6:50 pm 
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Joined: Tue 06 Sep 2011 5:11 am
Posts: 60
Location: Ann Arbor
Redwolf wrote:
Unless they've changed it since we reviewed it at the old place, Rosetta Stone uses a Munster pronunciation, though not a pure Munster dialect.

I've not used it personally, but based on the many (often frustrated) questions we used to get about it at the other place, and on my daughter's experience with Rosetta Stone for Japanese, I have strong reservations about it (especially given the price) and would consider it, at best, to be a learning aid rather than a full-on teaching program. The advertising stresses the idea of learning a language in the same manner as a child learns his first language, but the reality is that adults aren't wired that way -- they really do need to know the "hows" and "whys" when learning a new language.

What my daughter found useful about the Japanese program is it did help with her pronunciation, and with making an automatic link between an image and the words describing it (we bought it for her when her Japanese class at school was dropped due to funding issues...she'd had about a year of Japanese instruction before that), but she also found it frustrating in many ways (particularly the lack of explanations regarding grammar).

From what I've seen, there are programs out there that will do what Rosetta Stone does at a fraction of the price.

Redwolf


I have Rosetta Stone. I called the company a few years ago and was informed that it is Munster dialect that they used. The program is easy to use. One of the problems I have had is that my brain doesn't always make the correct connection between the word/phase and the picture. Also, one needs a good Irish grammar book use with it.

Sassy


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