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 Post subject: Sentence from 'An Litir'
PostPosted: Sat 27 Mar 2021 11:45 pm 
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Joined: Wed 16 Dec 2015 8:36 pm
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Hi everyone.

I'm wondering about the following sentence in 'An Litir' (to be specific the parts in bold)

"...an fhaiche babhlála agus an fhaiche imeartha, na cluiche caide, na crúcaí agus an iomáint poill."

I'm not sure what 'crúcaí would refer to in this sentence. My guess is that they are some kind of hooks for a climbing activity?

What about "Iomáint poill"? My guess here is that, as the same paragraph refers to a swimming pool (poll snámha), maybe this is referring to a water sport.

I would really appreciate if someone else could weigh in on this.


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PostPosted: Sun 28 Mar 2021 1:17 pm 
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Joined: Thu 01 Sep 2011 11:36 pm
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Here's my stab at it:

"...an fhaiche babhlála agus an fhaiche imeartha, na cluiche caide, na crúcaí agus an iomáint poill."

". . . the bowling green and the playing field, of the game of football, of the hooks (see below 1) and the hurling pulls (see below 2)"

It seems like these are in the genitive but I can't tell without previous context. And I can't figure what "poill" means but I thought it is possible it refers to "pull" as described below. The only problem is it doesn't seem to fit any way grammatically.

These definitions from Wikipedia under "Hurling":

1. "the 'hook' [is] where a player approaches another player from a rear angle and attempts to catch the opponent's hurley with his own at the top of the swing"

2. "'pull' (name given to swing the hurley with extreme force"

I'm hoping someone can come and shed some light on this. :D

Cheers,

Tim


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PostPosted: Sun 28 Mar 2021 5:49 pm 
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Joined: Sun 28 Aug 2011 8:29 pm
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An fhaiche babhlála agus an fhaiche imeartha,
I first thought because of the way it was written that it might have meant, the practice field and the playing field. But I can't find any reference to that online. So Tim is probably correct, it is bowls or bowling field.

na cluiche caide,
The football games
Also called "peil".

na crúcaí
My first thought was throwing horseshoes. But I'm probably wrong.

agus an iomáint poill."
I don't know what "poll" is in that context.


I'm sure there are people on the forum more knowledgeable about sports than I am.


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