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PostPosted: Mon 06 Nov 2017 9:16 pm 
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I've been working on a setting in a campaign I'm building for D&D game, and want to incorporate a bit of Gaelic. Decided to put together some titles by looking up various words, but I have questions in regards to grammar, and if my approach is even the right way to go about this kind of thing.

I'm wanting a term/title that essentially means something akin to "healing fairy" or "healer fae". The closest I've found is Leighis si, but this is simply throwing a couple words together. I'm not sure if this is conjugated properly, or if it should be hyphenated, or if like some languages the like-syllables should be combined in some way. Or heck, for all I know I'm completely wrong.


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PostPosted: Mon 06 Nov 2017 9:55 pm 
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WitchRolina wrote:
I've been working on a setting in a campaign I'm building for D&D game, and want to incorporate a bit of Gaelic. Decided to put together some titles by looking up various words, but I have questions in regards to grammar, and if my approach is even the right way to go about this kind of thing.

I'm wanting a term/title that essentially means something akin to "healing fairy" or "healer fae". The closest I've found is Leighis si, but this is simply throwing a couple words together.


Yes. ;)

Quote:
I'm not sure if this is conjugated properly, or if it should be hyphenated, or if like some languages the like-syllables should be combined in some way. Or heck, for all I know I'm completely wrong.


sióg leighis = fairy healer / healing fairy
an tsióg leighis = the fairy healer


Last edited by Labhrás on Tue 07 Nov 2017 8:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue 07 Nov 2017 4:02 pm 
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I think one should spell it "síóg".
If you spell "síog" it would be pronounced "sheeg".

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Is fearr Gaeilg na Gaeltaċta ná Gaeilg ar biṫ eile
Agus is í Gaeilg Ġaoṫ Doḃair is binne
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PostPosted: Tue 07 Nov 2017 6:05 pm 
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Ah, I see. Thanks for explaining it to me. The site I used referred to si as a modifier, though it doesn't explain how or what it modifies:

http://www.focloir.ie/en/dictionary/ei/fairy

Could you explain when to use siog and when to use si?

Also, how would I pronounce those? As english was my first language, I'm not really familiar with most diacritical marks and how they modify sounds.


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PostPosted: Tue 07 Nov 2017 7:10 pm 
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As the dictionary says, is a genitive singular that is used as an adjective to describe other nouns, as in examples: ceol sí ‘fairy music’. It does not actually say what noun it is a gen.sg. of.

Another dictionary, FGB confirms ceol sí ‘enchanting (fairy) music’ (the first meaning), and claims it is gen.sg. of a masculine noun ‘fairy mound’. So ceol sí is literally ‘fairy mound’s music, music of a fairy mound’.

So means normally (as a masculine noun) ‘a fairy mound’, and only in compounds it is translated as adjective ‘fairy’. The noun ‘fairy’ is a feminine sióg.

BTW, the genitive singular of sióg is sióige, so if you want to say ‘music of the fairy’ (that is played by this particular one fairy), you’d say ceol na sióige.


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PostPosted: Tue 07 Nov 2017 9:11 pm 
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Okay, so I'm a bit confused. If Fairy is being used as an adjective, it's Si, but as a noun, it's Siog, right? Then wouldn't that mean that both siog leighis or leighis si would be correct, but have different implications? The first being healing descrining the fairy, the second being fairy describing the healer?


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PostPosted: Tue 07 Nov 2017 10:10 pm 
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WitchRolina wrote:
Okay, so I'm a bit confused. If Fairy is being used as an adjective, it's Si, but as a noun, it's Siog, right? Then wouldn't that mean that both siog leighis or leighis si would be correct, but have different implications? The first being healing descrining the fairy, the second being fairy describing the healer?


Síóg=noun
sí=adjective
leighis= adjective

síóg leighis= (a) fairy healer: pronounced "shheeeooog lyishh"
leigheas sí= fairy medicine

leighis sí just doesn't make any sense because it's just two adjectives next to each other without a noun


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PostPosted: Tue 07 Nov 2017 10:16 pm 
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Leighis also is a genitive singular, and means ‘of medicine, medicine’s’, and also is used as an adjective ‘pertaining to medicine’. The nominative is leigheas.

So leighis sí would mean ‘of medicine of a fairy mound’, and does not mean a lot on its own. As Irish does not like double genitives, and often does other things when it has sequences like ‘a son of a father of a brother of an uncle etc…’, I am not entirely sure if something like ‘effects of fairy medicine’ would be éifeachtaí leighis sí or éifeachtaí leigheas sí¹…

‘fairy medicine’ could be leigheas sí, lit. ‘medicine of a fairy mound’ (although there might be better ways to say it, I am far from being native or even actually competent in the language).
‘healer fairy’ is sióg leighis, lit. ‘fairy of medicine’.

¹ GnaG gives only examples with one of the nouns definite. Anyone care to comment what happens to ‘a X of a Y’? Can multiple genitive happen here?


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