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PostPosted: Sat 12 Nov 2011 4:51 am 
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Ok...I think I got it....maybe.... 8O

so if I say: Faigh neart a-staigh, oir is turas e an saoghal........ does that make sense and is correct for Scottish Gaelic?


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 Post subject: "Fan laidir...."
PostPosted: Sat 12 Nov 2011 2:17 pm 
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I have two different ones please....

Fan láidir = stay strong or something like that

Faigh neart a-staigh, oir is turas is e an saolghal = Find strength within, for life is a journey

Not sure how accurate the translations are but I've had input from here...I know it's Scottish Gaelic and this place is for Irish AND someone said there are not many Scottish "experts" on here. But I would really love any sort of input that I can get! Or maybe someone tell me a specific person I should direct my questions to?

I have been lookimg around for a while for ways to find this out and get corrections and so far this forum has been the most helpful so thank you all! :clap:


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 Post subject: Re: "Fan laidir...."
PostPosted: Sun 13 Nov 2011 4:08 am 
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Emily116 wrote:
I have two different ones please....

Fan láidir = stay strong or something like that

Faigh neart a-staigh, oir is turas is e an saolghal = Find strength within, for life is a journey

Not sure how accurate the translations are but I've had input from here...I know it's Scottish Gaelic and this place is for Irish AND someone said there are not many Scottish "experts" on here. But I would really love any sort of input that I can get! Or maybe someone tell me a specific person I should direct my questions to?

I have been lookimg around for a while for ways to find this out and get corrections and so far this forum has been the most helpful so thank you all! :clap:


I was part of the SG threads where you got both of these, and I was waiting to see if Lughaidh or someone else would comment on the translations back in the thread you have in the SG section, since his Gaelic appears to be better than mine. Lughaidh did respond, and seems to be ok with the translations. There's another regular whose Gaelic is also better than mine, but he hasn't chimed in there yet. However, I'll offer the following Scottish Gaelic pronunciations for now, but perhaps Lughaidh or someone else can chime in and/or give you the IPA symbols to make it clearer (you have a few typos above, by the way, which I've corrected below):

Fan làidir [note which way the accent is slanted - you have it the Irish way above]
Fonn LAH-jerr

Faigh neart a-staigh, oir is turas e an saoghal
fiekh nyarrt uh stiekh uth iss TURR-uss ay uh SOO-ull

Notes on my phonetics above:
"ie" = like the English word "pie"
"kh" = light guttural sound, like the "ch" in Loch Ness, but softer
In "uth" the "th" sound is soft, as in the English word "breath", but even softer. This is what the "soft r" sounds like in modern Gaelic (actually, it's not the same everywhere, but this is clearly the modern trend).
"ss" = a true "s" sound ("is" does not have a "z" sound, as in English)

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I'm not a native (or entirely fluent) speaker, so be sure to wait for confirmations/corrections, especially for tattoos.


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 Post subject: Re: "Fan laidir...."
PostPosted: Sun 13 Nov 2011 3:10 pm 
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Thanks, yes everything was all very helpful in the other thread from you and the others. I just thought I would ask about the pronunciation in the "pronunciation section" in case others who were NOT following the other thread had input. Sorry if I should have just left it there....


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PostPosted: Sun 13 Nov 2011 5:04 pm 
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Hi, Emily. I've merged your pronunciation thread back into the translation request. You weren't to know (and we are all still just settling in here ourselves) but the "Fuaimniú - Pronunciation" section is really for more general questions about Irish.

It is better for translation pronunciations to be kept in the original thread with the translation and in the case of Scottish Gaelic it is safer to stay in the Gàidhlig - Gaeilge na hAlban - Scottish Gaelic section otherwise you might end up with an Irish pronunciation for a Scottish phrase, etc. ;)

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WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Sun 13 Nov 2011 6:36 pm 
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Sorry! I've never been part of a forum before so forgive me while I figure things out. And yes I guess that does make sense to keep it in one place. Thanks again for everyones help!


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PostPosted: Sun 13 Nov 2011 7:01 pm 
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Emily116 wrote:
Sorry! I've never been part of a forum before so forgive me while I figure things out.

No, I am the one who should apologise. We've only been going a few months here ourselves and are still sorting out issues with the change of format. Sorry for the confusion while we get organised. :wave:

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WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Mon 19 Mar 2012 11:54 pm 
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CaoimhínSF wrote:
Quote:

neart a-staigh or neart taobh a-staigh. Gaelic also has another colorful expression, am broinn, which literally means "in the belly", but is used to say "within" or "inside" in all sorts of situations. In the case of your expression, am broinn would actually have a nice double meaning, so I suggest using neart am broinn. Your second expression works fine in Gaelic, with some spelling changes: Is turas e an saoghal [note that, in modern Gaelic, there is normally no accent on the word e].


Some people consider the word oir ("for") used that way to be a bit formal in modern Gaelic (there are a lot of things like that which people understand, but would not use themselves for the most part). To avoid that you could switch to "because":

Faigh neart am broinn, a chionn is gur turas e an saoghal
Find strength within, because life is a journey.


Just wandering there Caoimhín, in Irish broinn means womb, does broinn mean womb in Scottish Gaelic too? or what is the Gáidhlig for womb? (sorry about the wrong fada don't know how ti slant it the other way on the computer).

The only other words I have for stomach is bolg and goile. Goile can also mean appetite too.

I was just wandering did broinn origionally mean stomach in Irish and then because of the caighdeán that word was assigned to mean something else. Example: iomáint, ciomáint (Munster), tiomáint all mean to drive. Iomáínt became hurling, tiomáint is used to drive a car (even in Munster) but ciomáint is used to drive cattle or sheep- i.e to drive the cattle up the hill.

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Is Fearr súil romhainn ná ḋá ṡúil inár ndiaiḋ
(Amhlaoibh Ó Súilleabháin)

Please wait for corrections/ more input from other forum members before acting on advice


I'm familiar with Munster Irish/ Gaolainn na Mumhan (GM) and the Official Standard/an Caighdeán Oifigiúil (CO)


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PostPosted: Tue 20 Mar 2012 12:08 am 
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Quote:
Just wandering there Caoimhín, in Irish broinn means womb, does broinn mean womb in Scottish Gaelic too? or what is the Gáidhlig for womb? (sorry about the wrong fada don't know how ti slant it the other way on the computer).

The only other words I have for stomach is bolg and goile. Goile can also mean appetite too.

I was just wandering did broinn origionally mean stomach in Irish and then because of the caighdeán that word was assigned to mean something else. Example: iomáint, ciomáint (Munster), tiomáint all mean to drive. Iomáínt became hurling, tiomáint is used to drive a car (even in Munster) but ciomáint is used to drive cattle or sheep- i.e to drive the cattle up the hill.


Actually, in Gaelic broinn is the dative form of brù, which can mean belly, womb, or in older writings a (generally large) bulge. The genitive form is bronn. The expression am broinn is an idiom, and as I said it can be used in non-bodily references as well, such as am broinn an taighe (= "inside the house").

If you are using a PC (and not a Mac), there is a way to type accented characters using what are known as “ASCII codes”. Make sure that you have [Num Lock] on, then hold down the [Alt] key and, while continuing to hold it down, type the three- or four-digit number indicated for a given letter on the keypad (that’s the set of keys all the way to the right on your extended keyboard:

Irish [Gaeilge]
á 160 Á 0193
é 130 É 0201
í 161 Í 0205
ó 162 Ó 0211
ú 163 Ú 0218

Scottish Gaelic [Gàidhlig]
à 133 À 0192
è 138 È 0200
ì 141 Ì 0204
ò 149 Ò 0210
ù 151 Ù 0217

Sorry the letters and numbers are cramped together above. The software on the forum seems to ignore the extra spaces I tried to put in to make the list more easily readable.

If you are using a laptop and just have the main keyboard, there may be an extended keyboard hidden within it, if you see little numbers (mine are in blue) in the center set of keys, arranged like a keypad. You can use them the same way as above, except that you need to use one more finger. You have to hold down the [Fn] ("Function") key as well, which on my laptop is also marked in blue.

_________________
I'm not a native (or entirely fluent) speaker, so be sure to wait for confirmations/corrections, especially for tattoos.


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PostPosted: Mon 16 Apr 2012 1:05 am 
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CaoimhínSF wrote:
Quote:
Just wandering there Caoimhín, in Irish broinn means womb, does broinn mean womb in Scottish Gaelic too? or what is the Gáidhlig for womb? (sorry about the wrong fada don't know how ti slant it the other way on the computer).

The only other words I have for stomach is bolg and goile. Goile can also mean appetite too.

I was just wandering did broinn origionally mean stomach in Irish and then because of the caighdeán that word was assigned to mean something else. Example: iomáint, ciomáint (Munster), tiomáint all mean to drive. Iomáínt became hurling, tiomáint is used to drive a car (even in Munster) but ciomáint is used to drive cattle or sheep- i.e to drive the cattle up the hill.


Actually, in Gaelic broinn is the dative form of brù, which can mean belly, womb, or in older writings a (generally large) bulge. The genitive form is bronn. The expression am broinn is an idiom, and as I said it can be used in non-bodily references as well, such as am broinn an taighe (= "inside the house").

If you are using a PC (and not a Mac), there is a way to type accented characters using what are known as “ASCII codes”. Make sure that you have [Num Lock] on, then hold down the [Alt] key and, while continuing to hold it down, type the three- or four-digit number indicated for a given letter on the keypad (that’s the set of keys all the way to the right on your extended keyboard:

Irish [Gaeilge]
á 160 Á 0193
é 130 É 0201
í 161 Í 0205
ó 162 Ó 0211
ú 163 Ú 0218

Scottish Gaelic [Gàidhlig]
à 133 À 0192
è 138 È 0200
ì 141 Ì 0204
ò 149 Ò 0210
ù 151 Ù 0217

Sorry the letters and numbers are cramped together above. The software on the forum seems to ignore the extra spaces I tried to put in to make the list more easily readable.

If you are using a laptop and just have the main keyboard, there may be an extended keyboard hidden within it, if you see little numbers (mine are in blue) in the center set of keys, arranged like a keypad. You can use them the same way as above, except that you need to use one more finger. You have to hold down the [Fn] ("Function") key as well, which on my laptop is also marked in blue.




I must be using a mac because it ain't working for me

_________________
Is Fearr súil romhainn ná ḋá ṡúil inár ndiaiḋ
(Amhlaoibh Ó Súilleabháin)

Please wait for corrections/ more input from other forum members before acting on advice


I'm familiar with Munster Irish/ Gaolainn na Mumhan (GM) and the Official Standard/an Caighdeán Oifigiúil (CO)


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