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PostPosted: Mon 20 May 2013 6:01 pm 
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Hello, my friend is getting married and her fiance is Scottish..she wants to surprise him with the script being read in both English and Scottish Gaelic, and has tasked me with the translation..only I haven't been able to find anyone who can help..and aside from going to him and asking him for the translation which would totally ruin the surprise...I decided to Google it..which brought me here..

So can someone help me translate the traditional wedding ceremony script for Catholics into Scottish Gaelic? Please and Thank you.


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PostPosted: Mon 20 May 2013 11:37 pm 
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I don't know the text but it must exist. By the way, who will read the text? Someone who knows Gaelic, I hope :)

I know there are some Catholic Gaelic-speaking areas in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland, for instance the Isle of Barra. Maybe you could contact people through this website:
http://www.barracatholic.co.uk/

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Is fearr Gaeilg na Gaeltaċta ná Gaeilg ar biṫ eile
Agus is í Gaeilg Ġaoṫ Doḃair is binne
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PostPosted: Thu 23 May 2013 6:03 am 
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Quote:
Hello, my friend is getting married and her fiance is Scottish..she wants to surprise him with the script being read in both English and Scottish Gaelic, and has tasked me with the translation..only I haven't been able to find anyone who can help..and aside from going to him and asking him for the translation which would totally ruin the surprise...I decided to Google it..which brought me here..

So can someone help me translate the traditional wedding ceremony script for Catholics into Scottish Gaelic? Please and Thank you.

I can give you basic vows, which is probably enough of a mouthful to impress him, and the others at the ceremony. I wasn't certain from my original source whether these were Catholic or Protestant forms of the vows, but I'm editing this to add that I just found a site which says they are the ones used in the Church of Scotland (the main Presbyterian church). The text, however, is non-specific to either religion. Gaelic-speaking Catholics and Protestants in Scotland shared the same Bible translation for a long time, so I wouldn't be surprised if the vows in Gaelic used by Catholics are close to (or even identical with) these, but I haven't found any confirmation of that. If you want them, I can also supply you with any other part of the Catholic mass in Gaelic, as well as various Catholic prayers.

As Lughaidh noted, there are Gaelic-speaking Catholics on Barra and South Uist, plus some in the area around Oban. There are also Catholics near Inverness and in other places (not counting the large number of Irish Catholic immigrants, especially around Glasgow), but I'm not sure how many of them speak Gaelic anymore. About 80% of the Gaelic speakers in Scotland today are Protestants.

I've also found a link for someone in California who performs weddings in Gaelic. She/he is a Protestant minister, and I assume it's for a fee, but the person might be willing to provide some info for free: http://scotgaelic.tripod.com/wedding.html

I've heard that the Gaelic College in Nova Scotia also does weddings in Gaelic, and there are both Catholic and Protestant Gaelic speakers in Nova Scotia, so they might be able to help. Here is a link for the college: http://www.celticheart.ca/gaelic-college-celtic-arts-and-crafts

A final suggestion is to contact someone at the Gaelic college on the Isle of Skye, Sabhal Mor Ostaig, and here's their link: http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/beurla
The Gaelic speakers on Skye are all Protestants now, I believe, but I assume the college has connections to Catholic Gaelic speakers as well.

Keeping that info in mind, here are the vows which I do have. I've added a very rough pronunciation guide as well. Some Gaelic sounds are hard for English speakers to produce, but the non-Gaelic speakers won't know if you make a mistake, and any Gaelic speakers will be impressed that you made the attempt. I've also changed your subject line (my first time doing that as a new moderator), in case anyone else comes along who might have info on this subject.

Bóid pòsaidh anns a' Ghàidhlig
Wedding Vows in Gaelic

Am Fear
The groom

Tha mise [groom’s name] a-nis 'gad ghabhail-sa [bride’s name] gu bhith 'nam chéile phòsda.
I, [groom's name] now take you [bride’s name] to be my wife.
"Ha MEESH-uh [groom’s name] a-NEESH 'gat GAV-ull-suh [bride’s name] goo vee num KHAY-luh PHAWS-tuh."

Ann am fianais Dhé 's na tha seo de fhianaisean tha mise a' gealltainn a bhith 'nam fhear pòsda dìleas gràdhach agus tairis dhuitsa, cho fad's a bhios an dìthis againn beò.
In the presence of God and before these witnesses I promise to be a loving, faithful and loyal husband to you, for as long as we both shall live.
"Own um FEE-un-nish yay's na ha shaw jay EE-yan-i-shan ha MEESH-uh a GYALL-ting a vee num err PAWS-tuh JEE-lus GRAG-ukh ag-us TAR-ish GOOT-sa, kho fat's a veese un JEE-ish ACK-een byaw."


A' Bhean
The Bride

Tha mise [bride’s name] a-nis 'gad ghabhail-sa [groom's name] gu bhith 'nam chéile pòsda.
I, [bride’s name] now take you [groom's name] to be my husband.
"Ha MEESH-uh [bride’s name] a-NEESH 'gat GAV-ull-suh [groom's name] goo vee num KHAY-luh PAWS-tuh."

Ann am fianais Dhé 's na tha seo de fhianaisean tha mise a' gealltainn a bhith 'nam bhean phòsda dhìleas ghràdhach agus thairis dhuitsa, cho fad's a bhios an dìthis againn beò.
In the presence of God and before these witnesses I promise to be a loving, faithful and loyal wife to you, for as long as we both shall live
"Own um FEE-un-nish yay's na ha shaw jay EE-yan-i-shan ha MEESH-uh a GYALL-ting a vee num ven FAWS-tuh YEE-lus GRAG-ukh ag-us HAR-ish GOOT-sa, kho fat's a veese un JEE-ish ACK-een byaw."


Note that the "s" sounds in the pronunciation guides above are all true "s" sounds (no "z's"), except that the "sh" sounds are as you'd expect, and the "kh" is the guttural "ch" sound in Loch.
When a word has more than one syllable, there is usually a very strong stress on the first syllable, which I've shown all in caps.
Note also that some of the adjectives are written and pronounced differently when used for a man or a woman, for grammatical reasons, and if you compare the pronunciation guides above, you'll see the differences.

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I'm not a native (or entirely fluent) speaker, so be sure to wait for confirmations/corrections, especially for tattoos.


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