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PostPosted: Wed 13 Mar 2024 1:17 am 
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What is the quickest way to identify the dialect used in a piece of text? Are there any convenient tells?

Ulster

Connacht

Munster

CO


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PostPosted: Wed 13 Mar 2024 5:02 pm 
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Bungus mac wrote:
What is the quickest way to identify the dialect used in a piece of text? Are there any convenient tells?

Ulster

Connacht

Munster

CO


Well, if it says "go rabhadar", it's Munster. If it says "go raibh siad" it's not.

If it has lenition after a preposition combined with the article, it's Ulster. (faoi an bhord vs. fén mbórd). Usually. There are exceptions eg don phobal in Cork Irish (=don bpobal in Kerry).


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PostPosted: Wed 13 Mar 2024 6:48 pm 
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djwebb2021 wrote:

Well, if it says "go rabhadar", it's Munster. If it says "go raibh siad" it's not.



Except where that's used a lot in Conamara.

Really, the quickest way is rule out Conamara/Connacht more generally. In the lines of what was said, look for synthetic forms. If they're present, it's most likely Munster (outside of -im). Then look for tell-tale signs of Donegal Irish, namely the lenition in the dative. Then you're probably left with Connacht.


Ruling out the Caighdeán is tricker, and usually involves spelling.

But, really, it's very difficult unless you know a lot about the dialects, as a lot of modern writing, in particular, is mostly dialect-flavoured Caighdeán, and the trait mentioned for Donegal, at least, is accepted in the Caighdeán too. For Connacht, perhaps the most consistent thing would be to look for sa + urú across all positions.


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PostPosted: Mon 18 Mar 2024 12:36 am 
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Thanks lads. These have been very helpful.


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PostPosted: Wed 03 Apr 2024 6:53 pm 
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Posts: 3570
Location: An Astráil
If you see:

Cad é an ... (GU)
iontach maith (GU)
de ghnáth (GU, GM)

Céard (GC)
go hiondúil (GC)

Do (before the past tense of verb) (GM)
-míd (GM)
-mair (GM)

-mid (CO)
-mar (CO)

táim (CO, GM)
tá mé (GC, GU)

_________________

WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Wed 03 Apr 2024 7:05 pm 
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What about cén and cé na? CO or GC or both?

Cad é an and cad ia na = GM or maybe just Cork? What do they say in Corca Dhuibhne?

cad 'na thaobh - GM
'tuige = GM
cén fáth = GC???
cad chuige = GM/GC?


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