It is currently Thu 29 Feb 2024 4:25 pm

All times are UTC


Forum rules


Please click here to view the forum rules



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 3 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Cry Havoc
PostPosted: Wed 01 Nov 2023 11:42 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu 01 Sep 2011 11:36 pm
Posts: 677
This phrase seems to have been taken out of context and given a different focus or nuance, at least in popular culture. Literary people (scholars and so forth) may immediately know the difference.

What are your thoughts and how would you translate it? Has Shakespeare already been translated?

Shall in these confines with a monarch's voice
Cry 'Havoc,' and let slip the dogs of war

Tabhair/Tabhairigí/Tabhairimis rabhadh “Ródaigh” agus leig/leigigí/leigimis na árchoin.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Cry Havoc
PostPosted: Thu 02 Nov 2023 6:26 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu 22 Dec 2011 6:28 am
Posts: 356
Location: Corcaigh
tiomluasocein wrote:
This phrase seems to have been taken out of context and given a different focus or nuance, at least in popular culture. Literary people (scholars and so forth) may immediately know the difference.

What are your thoughts and how would you translate it? Has Shakespeare already been translated?

Shall in these confines with a monarch's voice
Cry 'Havoc,' and let slip the dogs of war

Tabhair/Tabhairigí/Tabhairimis rabhadh “Ródaigh” agus leig/leigigí/leigimis na árchoin.


I think it tends to mean "raise the alarm" idiomatically in the modern day, though obviously the intent here is a shout to indicate raiding should begin.

As a literal translation, maybe "scrois" a scairteadh, but I don't know if that does convey the idiomatic meaning very well.

My preference would be something like "ionsaíg/ionsaígí" a scairteadh


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Cry Havoc
PostPosted: Sat 04 Nov 2023 10:26 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu 01 Sep 2011 11:36 pm
Posts: 677
Ade wrote:
tiomluasocein wrote:
This phrase seems to have been taken out of context and given a different focus or nuance, at least in popular culture. Literary people (scholars and so forth) may immediately know the difference.

What are your thoughts and how would you translate it? Has Shakespeare already been translated?

Shall in these confines with a monarch's voice
Cry 'Havoc,' and let slip the dogs of war

Tabhair/Tabhairigí/Tabhairimis rabhadh “Ródaigh” agus leig/leigigí/leigimis na árchoin.


I think it tends to mean "raise the alarm" idiomatically in the modern day, though obviously the intent here is a shout to indicate raiding should begin.

As a literal translation, maybe "scrois" a scairteadh, but I don't know if that does convey the idiomatic meaning very well.

My preference would be something like "ionsaíg/ionsaígí" a scairteadh


I see. I think at the IGTF we used one or the other words you mention there, but somehow the English word "havoc" was kept in the final version and the guy tattooed it on himself. Something like "Scread 'Havoc' . . ." I cringed and still cringe at that one.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 3 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], Google [Bot] and 32 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group