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PostPosted: Mon 13 Feb 2023 3:15 am 
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Joined: Sat 24 Dec 2022 2:41 am
Posts: 4
Hello everyone,

I am currently working on a project and need some help with translating some words into Irish. I would appreciate any assistance from the community in translating these words:
- Listen well, dear traveler...
- But my dear...
- Little one
- Farewell
- Mortal, don't be afraid...

And a quote:
"Come away, O human child: To the waters and the wild with a fairy, hand in hand, for the world's more full of weeping than you can understand." - William Butler Yates.

Your help would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you in advance for your time and assistance. :D


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PostPosted: Mon 13 Feb 2023 5:58 am 
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Joined: Thu 01 Sep 2011 11:36 pm
Posts: 680
vlafr wrote:
- Listen well, dear traveler...
- But my dear...
- Little one
- Farewell
- Mortal, don't be afraid...

And a quote:
"Come away, O human child: To the waters and the wild with a fairy, hand in hand, for the world's more full of weeping than you can understand." - William Butler Yates.


- Listen well, dear traveler...

Éist go maith, a thaistealaí dhil. (Or maybe "dhil" can be replaced by "chóir" which means something like "fair" > fair traveller.)

- But my dear...

Ach a stór. (There are lots of ways to refer to someone in an affectionate way. I posted only one but other people here may have other ideas to offer.)

- Little one

If you are referring to a child, and you are addressing them directly then maybe

A pháiste or A leanbh beag

If only referring to them, páiste, leanbh beag

For this, it's best to give some specific context so we can translate it properly.

- Farewell

Slán slán (There are other ways to say this, too.)

- Mortal, don't be afraid...

A dhaonnaí, ná bíodh eagla ort. (The word "mortal" may have other various nuances that can be addressed according to your preference.)

"Come away, O human child! To the waters and the wild with a faery, hand in hand, for the world's more full of weeping than you can understand." - William Butler Yates.

Tar uait, a pháiste daonna! Chuig na huiscí agus an bhfásach le sióg, lámh ar láimh, toisc go bhfuil an domhan níos lán le gol ná mar is féidir leat a thuiscint.

This is one possibility but may have errors or better ways to say it.

Wait for more ideas and input.

Cheers,

Tim


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PostPosted: Mon 13 Feb 2023 9:30 am 
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Joined: Thu 27 May 2021 3:22 am
Posts: 1105
I think the adjective should be lenited in the vocative singular.
Also, I think the vocative may be well on the way out, but if it is used, then it is "a linbh".
The vocative singular of the adjective was traditionally bhig, also on the way out.

A linbh bhig
A linbh bheag
A leanbh bheag

These are all probably usable.

Leanbh is pronounced leanav, linbh is pronounced liniv.


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PostPosted: Mon 13 Feb 2023 9:32 am 
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Joined: Thu 27 May 2021 3:22 am
Posts: 1105
Chuig na huiscí agus an bhfásach - I can't comment definitively on all dialects, but chun+Gen is what I'm used to: chun na n-uisceacha agus an fhásaigh (or: agus na díthreibhe).

toisc go bhfuil an domhan níos lán le gol: níos láine de ghol (maybe "le" is OK too).


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PostPosted: Mon 13 Feb 2023 2:45 pm 
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Joined: Sat 24 Dec 2022 2:41 am
Posts: 4
tiomluasocein wrote:
vlafr wrote:
- Listen well, dear traveler...
- But my dear...
- Little one
- Farewell
- Mortal, don't be afraid...

And a quote:
"Come away, O human child: To the waters and the wild with a fairy, hand in hand, for the world's more full of weeping than you can understand." - William Butler Yates.


- Listen well, dear traveler...

Éist go maith, a thaistealaí dhil. (Or maybe "dhil" can be replaced by "chóir" which means something like "fair" > fair traveller.)

- But my dear...

Ach a stór. (There are lots of ways to refer to someone in an affectionate way. I posted only one but other people here may have other ideas to offer.)

- Little one

If you are referring to a child, and you are addressing them directly then maybe

A pháiste or A leanbh beag

If only referring to them, páiste, leanbh beag

For this, it's best to give some specific context so we can translate it properly.

- Farewell

Slán slán (There are other ways to say this, too.)

- Mortal, don't be afraid...

A dhaonnaí, ná bíodh eagla ort. (The word "mortal" may have other various nuances that can be addressed according to your preference.)

"Come away, O human child! To the waters and the wild with a faery, hand in hand, for the world's more full of weeping than you can understand." - William Butler Yates.

Tar uait, a pháiste daonna! Chuig na huiscí agus an bhfásach le sióg, lámh ar láimh, toisc go bhfuil an domhan níos lán le gol ná mar is féidir leat a thuiscint.

This is one possibility but may have errors or better ways to say it.

Wait for more ideas and input.

Cheers,

Tim


Thanks so much, Tim. This is greatly appreciated.
I was wondering if I should write the whole sentences (the words to be translated in bold). In case the meaning changes, here they are:

- Listen well, dear traveller, for I am about to unfold a tale steeped in enchantment and mystery.

- Oh, but my dear, you are not from these parts, are you?

- Oh, little one, let me spin you a tale of a magical...

- Listen close, my dear, and let me tell you a story...

- Ah, child, let me share with you the legend of Lugh.

- I see you, mortal, don't be afraid, follow me and I will show you wonders you have never seen before.

"Little one" and "Child" do not mean "a child" necessarily but more so like an endearing way to talk to someone, if that makes sense.


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PostPosted: Tue 14 Feb 2023 8:37 am 
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Joined: Thu 01 Sep 2011 11:36 pm
Posts: 680
OK, give us a few more days to "clean this up". As you can see, djwebb has made some corrections, comments, and possible alternative usages so we need to consider all that and the new information you have provided us with. Usually, our policy is to get at least 3 people involved to arrive at good translations, maybe 4 since my Irish is not native and not that great overall. Thanks for the clarifications and hang in there a bit.

Tim


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PostPosted: Wed 15 Feb 2023 1:18 pm 
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Joined: Sat 24 Dec 2022 2:41 am
Posts: 4
No problem. :)
Thanks again for all the help.


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