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PostPosted: Sun 14 Aug 2022 2:14 pm 
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Joined: Fri 22 Jan 2021 4:24 pm
Posts: 79
Hi, Guys…one more question!

I was wondering about three-syllable Irish verbs: like análaigh (to breathe) or malartaigh (to change, exchange, destroy)…Once they are put in future or conditional tense form (at least in the Ulster pronunciation {with óchaidh/eochaidh/óchadh/eochadh endings}) they seem to suddenly have too many syllables to comfortably maintain the stress on the first syllable, as is the standard in Ulster. In these cases, would stress perhaps be on the 2nd or 3rd syllable in future/conditional tense.

Examples:

Análóchaidh Tadhg. (Tadhgh will breathe.)
Pronunciation —> [AH.nah.luh.hee][TĪG] ? … very awkward sounding
Or… [ah.NAH.luh.hee][TĪG] … feels a bit more natural
Or… [ah.nah.LŌ.hee][TĪG] … sounds the most natural, to my ear.

Malartóchaidh Tadhg. (Tadhg will exchange.)
Pronunciation —> [MAH.lahr.tuh.hee][TĪG] ? … still very weird sounding
Or... [muh.LAHR.tuh.hee][TĪG] … sounds a little better
Or… [muh.lahr.TŌH.hee][TĪG] … sounds equally ok, but I’m not sure.

Thanks in advance… I ran into this problem yesterday, and I can’t seem to find an answer. :??:


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PostPosted: Sun 14 Aug 2022 6:03 pm 
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Joined: Thu 27 May 2021 3:22 am
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I don't see the relevance of there being more syllables. These can be pronounced with the accent on the first syllable. But it seems there are few long verbs in Irish and so it won't come up a lot.


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PostPosted: Sun 14 Aug 2022 7:47 pm 
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Joined: Fri 22 Jan 2021 4:24 pm
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Thanks, :good: I was probably overthinking it. :D You’re right though, there aren’t many three-syllable verbs, so at least there’s that! :LOL:


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PostPosted: Sun 14 Aug 2022 9:39 pm 
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Joined: Thu 15 Sep 2011 12:06 pm
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Stress on the 1st syllable in Ulster, in all words except certain compound words (amach, amuigh...).
Also -eo- and -ó- are normally pronounced like [a] when unstressed, in Donegal.

Análóchaidh [ˈanˠalˠahi] 1st syllable
malartóchaidh [ˈmʷalˠəɾtˠahi] 1st syllable

Only Munster Irish can have stress on non-initial syllables (apart from certain compound words like those I mentioned above, which are stressed on the 2nd syllable in all dialects).

Also afaik "Tadhg" is pronounced "tayg" [tɰeːgˠ], not "tie-g" in Donegal.

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Is fearr Gaeilg na Gaeltaċta ná Gaeilg ar biṫ eile
Agus is í Gaeilg Ġaoṫ Doḃair is binne
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PostPosted: Mon 15 Aug 2022 8:49 pm 
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Joined: Fri 22 Jan 2021 4:24 pm
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Ah! Go raibh míle maith agat, mar is gnách, a Lughaidh! That makes sense…and thank you for the extra tip about the pronunciation of Tadhg! :good:


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