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PostPosted: Mon 14 Dec 2020 2:31 pm 
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Joined: Mon 14 Dec 2020 2:23 pm
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How's it going guys. First time posting so I hope I don't do anything wrong.

Just wondering if anyone knows of books printed in Seanchló / Cló Gaelach?

I have "Laoi Oisin ar Tír na nÓg" edited by Tomás Ó Flannghaile 1907 and I am aware of Douglas Hyde's "Beside the Fire" or "Le h-Ais na Teineadh" (written in Cló Gaelach in the book) but I believe it's very difficult to obtain a hardcopy (I have a pdf scan).

Also, does anyone know of any Seanchló typewriters? They seem impossible to find no matter where I look.
I'm aware we can use online versions but I'd quite like to have the genuine article.

Go raibh maith agaibh in advance agus tá brón orm má chuir mé isteach oraibh.

Dylan


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PostPosted: Mon 14 Dec 2020 11:28 pm 
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Joined: Thu 01 Sep 2011 9:55 am
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Location: 91 - France
Dia dhuit a chara,

I think the best place to find them would be on Internet Archive. There's quite a few that you can look at there and you can download them if you promise to use them only for your own study and not to use them for any commercial gain. But there are some 'publishers' such as Gyan in India and Nabu in the USA that in fact do this, and you can look up their titles on Amazon or elsewhere. They tend to charge extra for the binding. The problem I find is that often the printing isn't always very clear - but you get used to it and once I've printed it out, I go through the text with a very fine pen and fill in the parts of letters that are missing so that it's easier to read - for example sorting out what could be 'in' or an 'm' that hasn't been printed properly. There can be quite a lot of typos or spelling mistakes. What is very useful is that often there is at the back either a glossary (gluais) or notes on the text or a bilingual vocabulary section and even at the end of the Storytelling Book by Douglas Hyde, he lists some of the mistakes. If there are other words that you can't understand, it's better to look in the Dinneen Dictionary which is also on Internet Archive as well as the Donovan Grammar of The Irish Language. On the RIA website there are transcriptions of them in Roman type as well as those of the stories that are to be found in the Gaelic Journal which again you can find on Internet Archive. I've already posted up here on this forum the website where you can read 'The Sword of Light Journal'. You can, if you wish, buy this kind of book from various second-hand bookshops in Ireland such as John's Bookshop, Charlie Byrne's in Galway and Dublin Bookbrowsers and although he tends to be quite expensive, he is on Abebooks. Another place to look, if you're interested in folktales, is Béaloideas on Jstor, but you have to sign up and pay some money to access this. If you live in Dublin it's much easier - you can go along to the National Library of Ireland.


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PostPosted: Tue 15 Dec 2020 3:56 pm 
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Joined: Mon 14 Dec 2020 2:23 pm
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Go raibh maith agat a Fhranc
That's very helpful. I was more so looking for printed books I can readily buy (especially re mythology) but it's very handy to know I can head onto Internet Archive. I do live in Dublin so I can pop down to the library if it's open.
I'll give Gaelic Journal a look too.
Thanks very much.

franc 91 wrote:
Dia dhuit a chara,

I think the best place to find them would be on Internet Archive. There's quite a few that you can look at there and you can download them if you promise to use them only for your own study and not to use them for any commercial gain. But there are some 'publishers' such as Gyan in India and Nabu in the USA that in fact do this, and you can look up their titles on Amazon or elsewhere. They tend to charge extra for the binding. The problem I find is that often the printing isn't always very clear - but you get used to it and once I've printed it out, I go through the text with a very fine pen and fill in the parts of letters that are missing so that it's easier to read - for example sorting out what could be 'in' or an 'm' that hasn't been printed properly. There can be quite a lot of typos or spelling mistakes. What is very useful is that often there is at the back either a glossary (gluais) or notes on the text or a bilingual vocabulary section and even at the end of the Storytelling Book by Douglas Hyde, he lists some of the mistakes. If there are other words that you can't understand, it's better to look in the Dinneen Dictionary which is also on Internet Archive as well as the Donovan Grammar of The Irish Language. On the RIA website there are transcriptions of them in Roman type as well as those of the stories that are to be found in the Gaelic Journal which again you can find on Internet Archive. I've already posted up here on this forum the website where you can read 'The Sword of Light Journal'. You can, if you wish, buy this kind of book from various second-hand bookshops in Ireland such as John's Bookshop, Charlie Byrne's in Galway and Dublin Bookbrowsers and although he tends to be quite expensive, he is on Abebooks. Another place to look, if you're interested in folktales, is Béaloideas on Jstor, but you have to sign up and pay some money to access this. If you live in Dublin it's much easier - you can go along to the National Library of Ireland.


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PostPosted: Tue 15 Dec 2020 4:44 pm 
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Joined: Thu 01 Sep 2011 9:55 am
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Location: 91 - France
Well if it's the Mythology with a capital letter M you're interested in, then I suggest that you have a look at the CODECS van Hamel website for all the references to the manuscripts and in which collections they are to be found. They also have a very useful section called 'Noda' which gives you explanations of the lettering and the various abreviations and other signs that you are going to come across. Of course Trinity have their own website where you can have a look at their collection, but there's the Isos Dias website for the others. You can find what are known as 'diplomatic' transcriptions that correspond with the originals on Internet Archive where you can also find the works of the scholars who have carried out important work in this field such as Eugene O'Curry at al. The RIA website also has transcriptions available. If you want to find out about the manuscripts of Saint Patrick there's Confessio.


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PostPosted: Wed 16 Dec 2020 10:45 am 
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Joined: Thu 01 Sep 2011 9:55 am
Posts: 2059
Location: 91 - France
Seo dhuit - YouTube - John Farrell - (pages in seanchló)

Jimín agus an Gandal : Céad Eagrán
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PeaQlUQDZnY

Pangur Bán
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zQoHxzaoHro

Féilí na Bliana 1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L540UJmZ7-c

Cáit an Cheoil agus a Fear
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8h8DC3IK-8

An Spailpín Fánach DÁNTA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gBVVN_R9mgQ

Peig is an Buachaill Aimsire (Seanchló)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Edsr2sM9M&t=268s

Fiche Blian ag Fás An Tórramh Meiriceánach
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z05dOlB6wHY

srl.....

(There's also Caitriona Weafer's site where you can listen and read in Irish at the same time on YouTube but it's not in seanchló.)


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