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PostPosted: Tue 21 Apr 2020 10:16 am 
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Joined: Sat 03 May 2014 4:01 pm
Posts: 1253
tiomluasocein wrote:
Labhrás wrote:
If you want to have the time adverb "ever" there must be an action.
Even in English "the best ... ever" involves some kind of understood action, i.e. "the best gift (I) ever (got)"
Of course, this action ist past tense (because you'll never know: you might get a better gift tomorrow or next birthday.)
So, "go deo" can't be used - but "riamh".
In Irish, the action is usually not omitted. (Though sometimes you will hear "is fearr riamh" by non-native speakers)
[/b]


On Foclóir, they offer the following examples, without showing action. How are these different in grammar than saying, "an bronntanas is mó riamh"?

an leibhéal is ísle riamh
an leibhéal is airde riamh


I wonder if native speakers use it.
There are for instance no examples by native speakers for superlatives with simple "riamh" in Nua-Chorpas na hÉireann (but a lot of examples by non-native authors)
Native speakers in the corpus use at least a short relative clause (e.g. ... a bhí riamh).
I'd suppose simple riamh is a "Béarlachas", a very verbatim translation of "ever" (or "all-time" as in https://www.focloir.ie/ga/dictionary/ei/all-time%20low)


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PostPosted: Tue 21 Apr 2020 12:53 pm 
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Joined: Thu 01 Sep 2011 11:36 pm
Posts: 365
Labhrás wrote:
tiomluasocein wrote:
Labhrás wrote:
If you want to have the time adverb "ever" there must be an action.
Even in English "the best ... ever" involves some kind of understood action, i.e. "the best gift (I) ever (got)"
Of course, this action ist past tense (because you'll never know: you might get a better gift tomorrow or next birthday.)
So, "go deo" can't be used - but "riamh".
In Irish, the action is usually not omitted. (Though sometimes you will hear "is fearr riamh" by non-native speakers)
[/b]


On Foclóir, they offer the following examples, without showing action. How are these different in grammar than saying, "an bronntanas is mó riamh"?

an leibhéal is ísle riamh
an leibhéal is airde riamh


I wonder if native speakers use it.
There are for instance no examples by native speakers for superlatives with simple "riamh" in Nua-Chorpas na hÉireann (but a lot of examples by non-native authors)
Native speakers in the corpus use at least a short relative clause (e.g. ... a bhí riamh).
I'd suppose simple riamh is a "Béarlachas", a very verbatim translation of "ever" (or "all-time" as in https://www.focloir.ie/ga/dictionary/ei/all-time%20low)


OK, yeah, I was thinking the same thing but I wasn't sure. Of course, I use Béarlachas way too much. :)

Go raibh maith agat arís.


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