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PostPosted: Thu 12 Mar 2020 10:15 pm 
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Hi All,

I was wondering if I could get the following translated into either Ulster Irish, Standard Irish, or Old Spelling please:
" For those I love, I will sacrifice ".

Thank you so much,

James :)


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PostPosted: Fri 13 Mar 2020 12:13 am 
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JamesMac99 wrote:
Hi All,

I was wondering if I could get the following translated into either Ulster Irish, Standard Irish, or Old Spelling please:
" For those I love, I will sacrifice ".

Thank you so much,

James :)

There is a verb in Irish with the meaning "to sacrifice" (íobair), but it's usually used in a literal, religious sense, with respect to the sacrifice of the mass, or a pagan physically offering something up as a sacrifice, so the following might be a good way to express what you want. Wait for other comments, though, because someone may have a better way to say it, or a better feel for whether using íobair in this context is ok.

Do na daoine atá grá agam dóibh
For the people whom I love

caithfidh mé mise féin leo
I will offer myself for them

_________________
I'm not a native (or entirely fluent) speaker, so be sure to wait for confirmations/corrections, especially for tattoos.


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PostPosted: Fri 13 Mar 2020 9:49 am 
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Thank you! Aye I will wait for a few confirmations before getting it done, I don't want to be that wally with an incorrect tattoo!


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PostPosted: Sat 14 Mar 2020 1:30 am 
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In my opinion "sacrifice" in English has the same religious meaning as "íobairt" in Irish. Only here it's used figuratively or with a broader meaning. So I think it's ok to use it.

So I'd say:

Dhéanfainn íobairt dom féin ar son iad súid a bhfuil grá agam dhóibh.

Conditional, as you don't know if it will happen yet.

It's probably needs spelling correction. :D


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PostPosted: Mon 16 Mar 2020 8:47 am 
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Thank you for this! I will wait out for confirmation that this is correct and then good to go I think!


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PostPosted: Mon 16 Mar 2020 12:48 pm 
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Bríd Mhór wrote:
In my opinion "sacrifice" in English has the same religious meaning as "íobairt" in Irish. Only here it's used figuratively or with a broader meaning. So I think it's ok to use it.

So I'd say:

Dhéanfainn íobairt dom féin ar son iad súid a bhfuil grá agam dhóibh.

Conditional, as you don't know if it will happen yet.

It's probably needs spelling correction. :D


Súid should be siúd .

Do you really say "ar son iad" instead of (Standard Irish) "ar a son"?
(Or is it to have an antecedent for the relative clause a bhfuil grá agam dhóibh?)

I'd suggest: ... ar son na ndaoine siúd a bhfuil grá agam dóibh


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PostPosted: Sat 21 Mar 2020 3:40 pm 
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Labhrás wrote:
Bríd Mhór wrote:
In my opinion "sacrifice" in English has the same religious meaning as "íobairt" in Irish. Only here it's used figuratively or with a broader meaning. So I think it's ok to use it.

So I'd say:

Dhéanfainn íobairt dom féin ar son iad súid a bhfuil grá agam dhóibh.

Conditional, as you don't know if it will happen yet.

It's probably needs spelling correction. :D


Súid should be siúd .

Do you really say "ar son iad" instead of (Standard Irish) "ar a son"?
(Or is it to have an antecedent for the relative clause a bhfuil grá agam dhóibh?)

I'd suggest: ... ar son na ndaoine siúd a bhfuil grá agam dóibh

Well, Bríd _is_ a native speaker, a Labhrais.

The Corpas at gaois.ie has examples of "ar son iad siúd" as well.

To me, iad súid a bhfuil grá agam dhóibh functions as a unit, so it is in the genitive relation by position.

Yours works too.

So, both of these work for me:

Dhéanfainn íobairt dom féin ar son iad siúd a bhfuil grá agam dóibh.

Dhéanfainn íobairt dom féin ar son na ndaoine siúd a bhfuil grá agam dóibh.

_________________

WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Sat 21 Mar 2020 5:25 pm 
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Breandán wrote:
Well, Bríd _is_ a native speaker, a Labhrais.


I know. The more I'm interested whether native speakers really say so. :)
I know people say "ar nós iad" but yet I haven't encountered "ar son" used so.

Quote:
The Corpas at gaois.ie has examples of "ar son iad siúd" as well.


corpas.focloir.ie hasn't.
(It probably contains less colloquial material)

Quote:
To me, iad súid a bhfuil grá agam dhóibh functions as a unit, so it is in the genitive relation by position.


Yes, an understandable justfication.


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