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PostPosted: Wed 29 May 2019 9:32 pm 
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Joined: Sun 26 May 2019 6:52 pm
Posts: 6
Location: North of Toronto, Canada
Hi Again Everyone

Thanks Ade for the encouraging words.

I am sure my first post was poorly written. I have made some notes for myself. I think I have answered my question but could you please check my work for errors and grab me if I am about to jump off a cliff !

I have been trying to figure out where the "parts of speech" go and roughly how the framework of the language works.

It looks like these are the analytic parts that do not change/are not inflected:
Pronouns
Prepositional pronouns
Adverbs

Verb roots have operations on them but this is just the same as any other European language, it's just conjugation.

Nouns have gender. In compound words, the second part marks the gender so if doorbell was an Irish word, bell would dictate the gender.

Irish avoids double articles, "the top of the stairs" becomes "top the stairs".

Adjectives must agree with nouns, there are operations on them to do this and they must also pluralize when needed.

Cases:

Go I -> "I" is the nominative case
Eat I sandwich -> "sandwich" is the accusative case
Took I bottle of juice -> "of" is not used, juice is put into the genitive case
Went I to park -> "park" is in dative case
Spoke I to mother -> "mother" is in vocative case

There are various operations to place nouns into these cases.

If I have things roughly correct...

I will work on my reading and pronunciation until it is roughly correct(but not even close to native sounding).

I plan on memorizing 100-250 verb roots and the pronouns including prepositional pronouns.

After this, I will try to learn to conjugate the verbs.

After this I will try to learn all the complex rules involved with noun cases. I will not learn them perfectly, I will just try to get things roughly correct.

After this, I will try to speak with people and I will continue to study, write and speak for many years.

Am I about to jump off a cliff?

Any pointers, corrections or dire warnings :)

-Pat


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PostPosted: Thu 30 May 2019 2:12 pm 
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Joined: Sun 28 Aug 2011 8:44 pm
Posts: 3496
Location: Santa Cruz Mountains, California, USA
pat-mccavery wrote:
Hi Again Everyone

Thanks Ade for the encouraging words.

I am sure my first post was poorly written. I have made some notes for myself. I think I have answered my question but could you please check my work for errors and grab me if I am about to jump off a cliff !

I have been trying to figure out where the "parts of speech" go and roughly how the framework of the language works.

It looks like these are the analytic parts that do not change/are not inflected:
Pronouns
Prepositional pronouns
Adverbs

Verb roots have operations on them but this is just the same as any other European language, it's just conjugation.

Nouns have gender. In compound words, the second part marks the gender so if doorbell was an Irish word, bell would dictate the gender.

Irish avoids double articles, "the top of the stairs" becomes "top the stairs".

Adjectives must agree with nouns, there are operations on them to do this and they must also pluralize when needed.

Cases:

Go I -> "I" is the nominative case
Eat I sandwich -> "sandwich" is the accusative case
Took I bottle of juice -> "of" is not used, juice is put into the genitive case
Went I to park -> "park" is in dative case
Spoke I to mother -> "mother" is in vocative case

There are various operations to place nouns into these cases.

If I have things roughly correct...

I will work on my reading and pronunciation until it is roughly correct(but not even close to native sounding).

I plan on memorizing 100-250 verb roots and the pronouns including prepositional pronouns.

After this, I will try to learn to conjugate the verbs.

After this I will try to learn all the complex rules involved with noun cases. I will not learn them perfectly, I will just try to get things roughly correct.

After this, I will try to speak with people and I will continue to study, write and speak for many years.

Am I about to jump off a cliff?

Any pointers, corrections or dire warnings :)

-Pat


I should mention that, in most cases, the dative case is the same as the nominative case. A notable exception: the name of the country. It's "Éire" in the nominative and "Éirinn" in the dative.

Also, don't let verbs intimidate you. Irish verbs are very regular (there are only 11 irregulars) and the rules for conjugating them are fairly straightforward.

Redwolf


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PostPosted: Thu 30 May 2019 2:15 pm 
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Joined: Sun 26 May 2019 6:52 pm
Posts: 6
Location: North of Toronto, Canada
Thanks Redwolf !

Yes, actually after Tagalog verbs, Irish verbs look like a walk-in-the-park, I am fearing all these cases so learning that dative is nominative most of the time, is a big help !

-Pat


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PostPosted: Thu 30 May 2019 2:27 pm 
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Joined: Sun 28 Aug 2011 8:44 pm
Posts: 3496
Location: Santa Cruz Mountains, California, USA
pat-mccavery wrote:
Thanks Redwolf !

Yes, actually after Tagalog verbs, Irish verbs look like a walk-in-the-park, I am fearing all these cases so learning that dative is nominative most of the time, is a big help !

-Pat


Yeah, typically all you have to worry about is nominative and genitive. Vocative is there, but the rules are so simple (use the vocative particle, lenite the first letter of an Irish name or title and, if it's a masculine name that ends in a broad vowel, make it slender. Don't inflect non-Irish names).

So...

A Sheáin
A Mháire
A Debbie

Redwolf


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PostPosted: Thu 30 May 2019 2:39 pm 
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Joined: Sun 26 May 2019 6:52 pm
Posts: 6
Location: North of Toronto, Canada
Thanks yet again Redwolf !


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