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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Sat 01 Jun 2019 12:06 am 
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Correction : In ann these sentences it should be "a dhéanamh" and not "á dhéanamh".
"Á dhéanamh" means "ag+a+déanamh" (at its doing).
"A dhéanamh" means "é a dhéanamh" (doing it).

Tá mé in ann a dhéanamh = tá mé in ann é a dhéanamh.
but
Tá mé á dhéanamh = I am doing it.

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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Sat 01 Jun 2019 2:58 am 
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Lughaidh wrote:
Correction : In ann these sentences it should be "a dhéanamh" and not "á dhéanamh".
"Á dhéanamh" means "ag+a+déanamh" (at its doing).
"A dhéanamh" means "é a dhéanamh" (doing it).

Tá mé in ann a dhéanamh = tá mé in ann é a dhéanamh.
but
Tá mé á dhéanamh = I am doing it.


:good:


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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Sat 01 Jun 2019 7:45 am 
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Posts: 1082
CaoimhínSF wrote:
Ba mhaith liom á dhéanamh mise féin.
I wish to do it myself.

As Lughaidh has already said:
to do it =
either a dhéanamh ("its doing")
or é a dhéanamh ("it to do").
(same in other sentences)

I must add:
Putting myself (mé/mise féin) at the end is only so in English.
In Irish this is impossible. Mé féin can only be where there is a pronoun mé (or a first person verb ending like -im or a preposition like liom) in its normal order .
to do it myself is at first "me to do it" mé é a dhéanamh and so combined with féin mé féin é a dhéanamh:
Ba mhaith liom mé féin é a dhéanamh. = I want to do it myself
or
Ba mhaith liom féin (é) a dhéanamh. = I myself want to do it.

Quote:
Rinne tú é tusa féin, a Jane.
You did it yourself, Jane.


Again, putting "yourself" at the end is English.
Rinne tú féin é, a Jane. = You did it yourself, Jane.


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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Sat 01 Jun 2019 8:54 am 
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Joined: Fri 18 Nov 2016 11:41 am
Posts: 30
Labhrás wrote:
Ba mhaith liom mé féin é a dhéanamh. = I want to do it myself
or
Ba mhaith liom féin (é) a dhéanamh. = I myself want to do it.


Interesting. Is the use of one over the other dialectal or are both forms found everywhere?


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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Sat 01 Jun 2019 3:50 pm 
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Posts: 1082
Suairc wrote:
Labhrás wrote:
Ba mhaith liom mé féin é a dhéanamh. = I want to do it myself
or
Ba mhaith liom féin (é) a dhéanamh. = I myself want to do it.


Interesting. Is the use of one over the other dialectal or are both forms found everywhere?


Both ...
But wait, I think, the second is the more natural one.

My point in the latter posting was: Féin is used in places where there is already a person marking.
But in "(Ba mhaith liom) é a dhéanamh" there is no such person marking. You wouldn't say "(Ba mhaith liom) mé é a dhéanamh" except there's another subject in the first part of the sentence: "(Ba mhaith leat) mé é a dhéanamh")

So, Ba mhaith liom féin (é) a dhéanamh. is the best choice.


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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Sat 01 Jun 2019 8:48 pm 
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Posts: 32
Location: USA
Thank you so much!


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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Sat 01 Jun 2019 8:53 pm 
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You guys are the best! I'm so grateful I found this forum :D :GRMA: :D :GRMA: :D


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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Sun 02 Jun 2019 5:04 pm 
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Thanks for your insight!


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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Tue 04 Jun 2019 8:45 pm 
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Posts: 70
vaerov wrote:
vaerov wrote:
Labhrás wrote:
Ade wrote:

1. A Cháit, a chailín cinn-óir!
2. A Katie, a chailín cinn-óir!

There's a character in Irish mythology, Niamh of the Golden Hair, whose name is translated similarly, Niamh Cinn-Óir.

Niamh Chinn-Óir a thugtar uirthi (mar gur bean a bhí inti)

And, though cailín is a masculine word, in vocative case lenition is necessary as well:

A Cháit, a chailín chinn-óir!

(cinn-óir = "head-of-gold", golden headed)


Thanks again! I'm so thankful for this forum!


I have another question. This one is a bit complicated (at least to me). I need a character's Irish surname to have the meaning of "beloved." Is there an Irish surname that roughly translates to "beloved," or might one be made up and still sound authentic? The surname would exist in the 16th Century Ulster and would belong to one of the chieftains, so it would also be a clan name. I've been looking all over the internet, and the closest I've come to is " O'Ghrá," although I am sure this sounds very wrong to Irish speakers! :D Any help would be greatly appreciated!


ó Néill , ó Domhnaill, ó Ruairc, ó Breifne, ó Conchubhair, ó Maoldomhnaigh , ó Connaill.... these were the most important families names in Ulster just before the Plantation of Ulster and what we refer to as "The flight of the Earls (Hugh O' Donnel and Red Hugh O' Neill, both left Ireland after the Battle of Kinsale ) when the last great Irish resistance to the invadesrs finished. The Maol/Mael prefix in Irish names dates from before 1000 AD and was used to describe someone who had shaved his head or who had lost his hair(Bald) ie MaelChiarán Bald Kieran, his offspring were named MaelChiarán to show that they were the offspring of Kieran the bald.This was common to distinguish one Kieran from another Kieran in the same district.We did not use surnames in Ireland until about the 17th century after English rule was firmly established.


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 Post subject: Re: Hello!
PostPosted: Wed 05 Jun 2019 9:26 am 
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micab wrote:
The Maol/Mael prefix in Irish names dates from before 1000 AD and was used to describe someone who had shaved his head or who had lost his hair(Bald) ie MaelChiarán Bald Kieran, his offspring were named MaelChiarán to show that they were the offspring of Kieran the bald.This was common to distinguish one Kieran from another Kieran in the same district.


Afaik, Maol was used to denote a devotee of a saint. That's the reason it is in genitive form (Maoil) in surnames and written apart from the name.
So, Ó Maoil Chiaráin is the descendant of a devotee of St Kieran.

Sometimes, Maol denotes a leader or warrior, written as a prefix, so Ó Maolchatha, descendant of a leader of war.

Both kind of persons probably had a tonsure.


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