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PostPosted: Thu 15 Nov 2018 4:42 am 
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So far I've come up with . . .
CíorToinne (ie Cíor Toinne)

This a made-up name for a flarecraft I have been working on in secret for about 15 years. An EM or Elektro Motive Flarecraft to be precise. My design is faster, more energy efficient, more mission adaptive alternative than High-Speed Railways; any imagined Hyperloop Tunnel, and Pods; and is able to service areas inaccessible and or economically unfeasible for Regional Commuter Jet Transports exemplified by the Embraer E-Jet Family with a capacity of 190 passengers in it largest variant.

Though it has onboard energy stored for any possible emergency landing, primary motive power is wireless remote, microwave that makes use of 3D Flash LiDAR to create virtual occultation of the beams preventing anything other than the ship's rectenna from being painted with microwave energy.

Nothing, no person or a bird no bigger than a wren could ever be harmed.

These flarecraft function as a demonstrator for my RoadEdge Emitter Arrays, a SmartGrid to SmartRoad ecosystem, only in this case we speak of vessels navigating a course over the sea, virtual roads traversing intracostal and tributary waters.

Aside from the pragmatic utility of these crafts in their leveraging of existing technologies and infrastructure, my overarching desire was to create a system with minimal environmental impact, and that would remain operational in the event of an earthquake* or any other catastrophe.

I've probably said more than I should and no doubt more than you wanted to know. I just wanted to paint a picture of these virtually silent, graceful craft, like gulls swiftly skimming only a meter or to about the wave tops.

*Note: I reside in the San Francisco Bay Area, hence my concern for earthquakes.


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PostPosted: Thu 15 Nov 2018 9:46 am 
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If you mean the crest of an ocean wave maybe

Suaitheantas Tonn

Wait for more ideas.


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PostPosted: Thu 15 Nov 2018 12:17 pm 
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It's not a word I'm familiar with in that context but the dictionary gives: Barróg

https://www.teanglann.ie/ga/fgb/barróg


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PostPosted: Thu 15 Nov 2018 10:06 pm 
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Using a word in common usage nullifies its efficacy as a trademark and brand name. It would be like naming your dog, "Dog" and somehow assuming people understood your use was a unique, proper name. A chief qualification for a copyright/trademark/brand name is that it cannot be an expression of common parlance, a common expression, in common use.

Hence my use of the word "Create" Irish-Inspired Branding, which is in no way a novel concept.

There are thousands of Irish made products that use unique wordplay to identify their service or product. Pick any language, any country and you'll find the same. For hundreds of years, people have used French, Italian, German words in marketing to suggest a specific character.

Kleenex (facial tissue)
In the USA, the Kleenex name has become—in common usage but not in law—genericized: the popularity of the product has led to the use of its name to refer to any facial tissue, regardless of the brand. Many dictionaries, including Merriam-Webster and Oxford, now include definitions in their publications defining it as such.

Q-Tips (American English cotton-tipped swabs, British English cotton-tipped buds)
Invented in the 1920s by Polish-American Leo Gerstenzang after watch his wife attach wads of cotton to toothpicks. His product, named "Baby Gays", went on to become the most widely sold brand name: Q-tips, meaning "quality tips". The term "Q-tips" is often used as a genericized trademark for cotton swabs in the US and Canada. have become almost useless trade names in the US because people use the names universally so often.

Reference Material
The United States Patent and Trademark Office

(Oifig Paitinne agus Trádmharc na Stát Aontaithe)
Trademark Basics
(Bunúsacha Trádmharc)
US TradeMark Basics

Oifig na bPaitinní
(The Irish Patent Office)
Tuiscint ar Thrádmharcanna
(Understanding Trade Marks)
Irish TradeMark Basics

I should have shared my linguistic research to save you repeating my earlier effort. In my defense, I am really not used to anyone doing anything other than attacking, dismissing, or ignoring my ideas. Please, give me time to get used to you being thoughtful, considerate folk.

Barróg is a common word associated more often with hugs and wrestling than waves at sea when I ran a search on it. Though I found the same dictionary entry for its reference to wave crest, I've not found any use of the word as a nautical term with a couple of search results turning up posts on this forum, where it's used in describing hugs.

Though I've found no audible example of pronunciation, the word isn't going to work phonetically well in any Indo-European, Teutonic or Latin tongue.
Barróg f. (gs. -óige, npl. ~a, gpl. ~)
https://www.teanglann.ie/en/fgb/barróg
2. Crested wave. ~a geala, white-crested waves.
3. Nau: Reef. ~ a chur i seol, to reef a sail.

Cíor, Círín, Caipín all sound good pronounced in languages other than Irish, don't translate into anything obscene, and each carries a poetic allusion to the crown, ca, or crest of a head, helmet, with two specifically mentioning use in describing crest of ridge, hill, wave.

In the case of Círín (toinne), which I'm favoring, this word has potential as you can see it has a connection with birds in addition to a reference to wave crests. I've tried to find an Irish poem describing a gull flying across the wave crests without any luck. I love the word for Seagull = Faoileán and tried to think of a way to directly play on some version of the word, but it only sounds proper to my ear when spoken in Irish of the Connemara. Perhaps I'll introduce the word by way of description in ad copy at a later date.

Clár toinne meaning Surf-Board is my inspiration, in case it wasn't obvious to start with.
https://www.teanglann.ie/en/fuaim/clár_toinne

Círín Toinne was one of several candidates in the running. I just couldn't convince myself Círín Toinne had the same resonate, the same authority as Cíor Toinne when heard out loud. To my ear, it sounds closer to the common phrase Clár Toinne don't you think?

Let me be clear, I didn't just pick "Cíor Toinne" or CíorToinne before just jumping right in to ask for help. Before reaching out I had already invested a lot of time and effort. I researched lots of prior examples, even subscribed to several Irish sailing, powerboating, and watersports organizations. There is a Learn Irish boating group in Washington DC but they only "mention" having Irish translations of nautical terminology, without publishing it online.

In the same way, Ireland is a mashup of Irish and German, I had also thought and discarded . . . names such as Cíorcraft, Círíncraft, Caipíncraft. A lot of aviation and marine craft manufacturers create brands by tacking "craft" onto a family name, or some special feature the vehicle possesses. I am personally not a fan of this, never was. Just seems lazy and unimaginative.

Cíor f. (gs. círe, npl. ~a, gpl. ~)
https://www.teanglann.ie/en/fgb/cíor
https://www.teanglann.ie/en/fuaim/cíor
1. Comb. (a) (Implement) ~ mhín, gharbh, fine, large-toothed, comb. ~ chinn, chúil, hair-comb. ~ chapaill, curry-comb. (b) Crest. ~ coiligh, cockscomb. ~ clogaid, crest of helmet. ~ cnoic, crest of hill.

Círín m. (gs. ~, pl. ~í)
https://www.teanglann.ie/en/fgb/círín
https://www.teanglann.ie/en/fuaim/círín
1. Crest. (a) (Of bird) ~ circe, hen’s crest. ~ coiligh, cockscomb. ~ dúbailte, double crest. (b) Ridge. ~ cnoic, toinne, crest of hill, of wave.

Caipín m. (gs. ~, pl. ~í)
https://www.teanglann.ie/en/fgb/caipín
https://www.teanglann.ie/en/fuaim/caipín
3. Crest (of wave). Tá an fharraige ag caitheamh ~í, the sea is foam-crested.


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PostPosted: Fri 16 Nov 2018 2:45 pm 
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Muir wrote:
Faoileán and tried to think of a way to directly play on some version of the word, but it only sounds proper to my ear when spoken in Irish of the Connemara.


You are so right. :LOL:


Caipín - I think that refers to the foam on top of a wave. It has a hat on it.

Círín - Again it's not a word I'm familiar with. But it is easily pronounced by English speakers.

Personally I'd say "barr toinne" but that is probably not the correct expression or it would be in the dictionary.

Toinne; tonn; faoileán - English speakers will butcher the pronunciation.
With big multi-national companies people will look up the pronunciation as they don't want to look stupid, but they're unlikely to do that with Irish.


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PostPosted: Fri 16 Nov 2018 6:56 pm 
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Barr Toinne is awesome, just brilliant because it fits perfectly and it absolutely IS NOT in any dictionary.
Thank you!

I seek to appeal to thoughtful people, folk who are knowledgeable about technology without worshiping at its altar. The care about the natural world and the impact humankind has upon it and are interested in seeing ways technology can be put to use in lessening the negative consequences of how we use nature or effect it in the use of our motorbikes, automobiles, lorries, planes, and trains.

Such people will show interest and take the time to look up a foreign word if it isn't too difficult. Besides, in my media presentation, there will be Irish speaking, as well as other cultures often perceived as having close ties to nature. There will be ample opportunity to hear these brand names said with correct pronunciation.


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PostPosted: Wed 21 Nov 2018 6:22 am 
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Irish American Thanksgiving
Lá Altaithe Sona Dhaoibh Go Léir / Happy Thanksgiving, Everyone!
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PostPosted: Sun 25 Nov 2018 9:17 am 
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Location: San Francisco, CA (USA)
You may recognize the Martian War Machines from the 1953 film War or the Worlds.
I may change the Gull from black to grey, or white.
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PostPosted: Mon 26 Nov 2018 8:17 pm 
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The latest iteration of Tonƞβarr™ meets WOTW 1953 :LOL:
Note: As I've said earlier, the modified Martian War Machines vis-a-vis the practical effects of George Pal in the 1953 film War of the Worlds are placeholders, so don't flip out on me. The landscape is a composite of some of my favorite NorCal (North California) coastline spots and a sky I created on the fly.
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PostPosted: Tue 27 Nov 2018 3:23 pm 
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Whatever about "Barr Toinne" which needed confirmation, "tonnbarr" is definitely wrong.


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