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PostPosted: Mon 02 Jul 2018 9:42 pm 
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Joined: Mon 02 Jul 2018 9:03 pm
Posts: 2
Well, guess I need to try this typing this whole thing again.

I'm making a gift for my cousin about the things that are important to him in life.

English version:
Strength of my family (aunts, uncles, cousins, etc. inlcuded)
Support of my friends (obviously not literal support, but metaphorical)
Love of my dogs (the unconditional love the dogs have, not his love for the dogs)
A pint of good beer (acceptable alternative is good glass of whiskey)

My amateur attempt:
Neart mo muintir (intentional use of muintir for family)
Tacaíocht mo chairde (right connotation for support?)
Grá mo mhadraí (Would grá ó mo mhadraí be better?)
Pionta beoir maith (or Gloine uisce beatha maith? Gloine dea-uisce beatha? No real idea here)

Thanks!


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PostPosted: Wed 04 Jul 2018 5:16 pm 
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Joined: Thu 22 Dec 2011 6:28 am
Posts: 97
Location: Corcaigh
dgunthert wrote:
Well, guess I need to try this typing this whole thing again.

I'm making a gift for my cousin about the things that are important to him in life.

English version:
Strength of my family (aunts, uncles, cousins, etc. inlcuded)
Support of my friends (obviously not literal support, but metaphorical)
Love of my dogs (the unconditional love the dogs have, not his love for the dogs)
A pint of good beer (acceptable alternative is good glass of whiskey)

My amateur attempt:
Neart mo muintir (intentional use of muintir for family)
Tacaíocht mo chairde (right connotation for support?)
Grá mo mhadraí (Would grá ó mo mhadraí be better?)
Pionta beoir maith (or Gloine uisce beatha maith? Gloine dea-uisce beatha? No real idea here)

Thanks!


I've made a couple of changes to just one word. They are below underlined and in bold, followed by explanations. Wait for others' opinions.

Neart mo mhuintire
Tacaíocht mo chairde
Grá mo mhadraí
Pionta beoir maith

mhuintire: So the first change to this word is a rule you already know. If a word following "mo" can be lenited (take a "h" after the initial letter) it will. You actually did this in the second and third lines with, "mo chairde" and "mo mhadraí".

The second change here is to put the word in the genitive case. In any case where you have "of" in a sentence representing belonging (e.g. the strength which belongs to my family), this case should be used. "Cairde" and "Madraí" are already genitive forms, so need no change. I don't think "pint of beer" is a genitive construction in the same way, as it's not a pint belonging to beer, and hence wouldn't take the genitive form.


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PostPosted: Thu 05 Jul 2018 7:38 am 
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Joined: Sat 03 May 2014 4:01 pm
Posts: 917
dgunthert wrote:
English version:
Strength of my family (aunts, uncles, cousins, etc. inlcuded)
Support of my friends (obviously not literal support, but metaphorical)
Love of my dogs (the unconditional love the dogs have, not his love for the dogs)
A pint of good beer (acceptable alternative is good glass of whiskey)

My amateur attempt:
Neart mo muintir (intentional use of muintir for family)

Neart mo mhuintire as Ade already wrote.
dgunthert wrote:
Tacaíocht mo chairde (right connotation for support?)
Grá mo mhadraí (Would grá ó mo mhadraí be better?)

A good objection. I'd think "grá mo mhadraí" means only "the love I have for my dogs"
At least grammars say so: There's only an objective genitive in Irish following nouns describing a transitive action.
So, Grá ó mo mhadraí is better.
The same is probably true for tacaíocht: Tacaíocht ó mo chairde.
dgunthert wrote:
Pionta beoir maith (or Gloine uisce beatha maith? Gloine dea-uisce beatha? No real idea here)

Pionta beorach maithe (genitive case is necessary here)
Gloine mhaith fuisce or Gloine mhaith uisce beatha (a good glass ... so maith belongs to gloine)


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PostPosted: Thu 05 Jul 2018 7:40 pm 
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Joined: Mon 02 Jul 2018 9:03 pm
Posts: 2
Thanks to you both!

One follow up: If I go with whiskey, I should probably change to gloine fuisce maith instead of the literal translation of what I wrote originally. While in English, the two constructions have the same meaning, it's actually the whiskey that the adjective should attach to, not the glass. After all, I don't think it's possible to have a good glass of bad whiskey or a bad glass of good whiskey!

So:

neart mo mhuintire
tacaíocht ó mo chairde
grá ó mo mhadrai
pionta beorach maithe or gloine fuisce maith


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PostPosted: Mon 23 Jul 2018 5:59 am 
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Joined: Sat 07 Feb 2015 11:24 am
Posts: 606
Location: Baile Mhic Ghoilla Eoin, VA
dgunthert wrote:
Thanks to you both!

One follow up: If I go with whiskey, I should probably change to gloine fuisce maith instead of the literal translation of what I wrote originally. While in English, the two constructions have the same meaning, it's actually the whiskey that the adjective should attach to, not the glass. After all, I don't think it's possible to have a good glass of bad whiskey or a bad glass of good whiskey!

So:

neart mo mhuintire
tacaíocht ó mo chairde
grá ó mo mhadrai
pionta beorach maithe or gloine fuisce maith


If you would like the 'maith' to refer to the whiskey, you will need
gloine fuisce mhaith
to be parallel with the beer

That being said, new allowances by the standard have suggested you can use:
pionta beoir mhaith or gloine fuisce maith
but traditionalists will eschew these

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