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 Post subject: the gods know
PostPosted: Sun 01 Jul 2018 7:24 am 
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Fios a dhéanamh do dhuine a ag dia atá a fhios .
Probably the a ag should be a'g , is that right?
The first part should mean " to tell a person his fortune" and the second "which a god alone knows".
Is that how you read it? Is there a similar expression about God knowing fate / destiny with the words Dia , fios ?

from Australia


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 Post subject: Re: the gods know
PostPosted: Sun 01 Jul 2018 8:30 am 
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chimera wrote:
Fios a dhéanamh do dhuine a ag dia atá a fhios .
Probably the a ag should be a'g , is that right?

No, it isn't right.
(Is) ag dia atá a fhios. = lit. "It is at a god that is his knowledge". (In such a statement "is" can be left out)
[...] is ag dia atá a fhios. = "what is at a god that is his knowledge"
Here "is" is a relative form (a + is = is). You can't leave it out. And certainly you can put the relative particle "a" only before a verb. "a ag" is impossible.

Quote:
The first part should mean " to tell a person his fortune" and the second "which a god alone knows".
Is that how you read it?

fios [...] duine + is [...] = fortune [...] person + which is [...]
This construction is at least ambigue. What noun does the relative clause refer to? The best candidate is "duine", not "fios".
And btw: "fios [...] atá a fhios" is at least odd ;)

But I'm too busy in the moment. So I can't give a better version.
Perhaps: Fios a dhéanamh do dhuine ach is ag dia amháin atá a fhios a chinniúint. (... but only a god knows his fortune)


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 Post subject: Re: the gods know
PostPosted: Sun 01 Jul 2018 10:53 am 
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Thank you Labhrás,

My question is more about the concepts of dia and fios together. Probably there is no compound word although there is diadhaidh, pious, diadha diadh, Old Irish diade, divinus.
fios : fiosrach.
You say " What noun does the relative clause refer to? The best candidate is "duine", not "fios". "
Do you mean that God is not thought of as knowing a person's fortune?
Sanskrit दैवविधि m. daivavidhi course of fate.
vidhi has the same rootword as fios.


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 Post subject: Re: the gods know
PostPosted: Sun 01 Jul 2018 11:47 am 
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chimera wrote:
Thank you Labhrás,

My question is more about the concepts of dia and fios together. Probably there is no compound word although there is diadhaidh, pious, diadha diadh, Old Irish diade, divinus.
fios : fiosrach.
You say " What noun does the relative clause refer to? The best candidate is "duine", not "fios". "
Do you mean that God is not thought of as knowing a person's fortune?


No, I just talked about the sentence structure, grammar.
I’m atheist; I know nothing about gods. ;)


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 Post subject: Re: the gods know
PostPosted: Tue 03 Jul 2018 5:46 pm 
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Location: An Astráil
chimera wrote:
Fios a dhéanamh do dhuine a ag dia atá a fhios .
Probably the a ag should be a'g , is that right?
The first part should mean " to tell a person his fortune" and the second "which a god alone knows".
Is that how you read it? Is there a similar expression about God knowing fate / destiny with the words Dia , fios ?

from Australia

If you look at the example in Ó Dónaill Ba cheart duit fios a gcreidimh a thabhairt dóibh, you can see how it should be done, i.e., "which a god alone knows" has to go next to fios:

Fios nach bhfuil ach ag dia a dhéanamh do dhuine
"To tell a person their fortune, which only a god knows."

If you want to change that order, then you need to repeat fios:

Fios a dhéanamh do dhuine - fios nach bhfuil ach ag dia
"To tell a person their fortune - a fortune which only a god knows."

Also from Australia

_________________

WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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 Post subject: Re: the gods know
PostPosted: Tue 03 Jul 2018 7:12 pm 
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Going with your comment title where you had "gods" in plural.

Tá 'fhios ag na déithe an todhchaí.

The gods know the future.


Whether that is good or bad fortune they're not making it known. :D
How can you say that one is telling your fortune, but then also say that only the gods know? That is contradictory.


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 Post subject: Re: the gods know
PostPosted: Wed 04 Jul 2018 6:57 am 
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Joined: Wed 01 May 2013 5:42 am
Posts: 17
Breandán

Ní labhraíonn mé ach bain úsáid as an chumhacht draíochta ar líne seo.


Irish, Old Irish día, Welsh duw, Old Welsh duiu.
The idea of a god and of knowing fate and fortune is in Sanskrit daivavidhi , Old Java Indonesia dewawidhi.
Welsh dewi is the dragon ( from *derk- "to see") , one sense of vidhi " see .know". Welsh duw "god" is the spelling here:

Read more... - Healing Magazine on Alternative and Complementary ...
http://www.theartofhealing.com.au/artist-steve.html
Bida-Ngulu lived in the sky and his greatest gift to men and women when he created them had been a dhuwidi, or living spirit .

There are about 300 Sanskrit-Java loanwords in north Australia and more in the south . But shillelagh is not one of them: "Muruwari tribe - meaning 'to fall (warri) with a fighting club (murru) in one's hand ".

Bríd Mhór
déithe fhios would be excellent if it was 1 word déithefhios . My opening sentence is illogical but so is a talking dragon unless the fortune teller is wearing a convincing costume and has good grammar ...


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 Post subject: Re: the gods know
PostPosted: Wed 04 Jul 2018 7:45 am 
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Joined: Wed 01 May 2013 5:42 am
Posts: 17
draíochta
draíochta ?
I thought Eire had no snakes .


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