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PostPosted: Thu 26 Apr 2018 2:49 pm 
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OK, think I got it now. Does the copula always cause this much head scratching?? :LOL:

:GRMA:


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PostPosted: Thu 26 Apr 2018 2:52 pm 
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Cúmhaí wrote:
Thank you, a Labhráis
I knew that I was not explaining it well. I am familiar with the word predicate only in the English sense where it means all of the sentence except the subject (or at least that is what I think it means). I did not realize that was even the name for the second noun involved in a copular phrase (or whatever they are called)


faisnéis in Irish. ;)

Yes, in traditional English grammar all but the subject is called "predicate".
Not so in German grammar, here it is only the verbal part.
And in modern syntax theories, subject and object are arguments of the predicate, both not being part of it.

In copula sentences, the predicate is (a verb like "to be" plus) a predicative nominal or a predicative adjective.
These terms aren't different in English and German (and Irish, except that "is" isn't really a verb in Irish but a particle).

The farmer is the fool (farmer = subject, fool = predicative)
Der Bauer ist der Narr (Bauer = subject, Narr = predicative)
Is é an t-amadán an feirmeoir (feirmeoir = subject, amadán = predicative)


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PostPosted: Thu 26 Apr 2018 5:14 pm 
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Location: Baile Mhic Ghoilla Eoin, VA
Labhrás wrote:
Yes, in traditional English grammar all but the subject is called "predicate".

I was never satisfied by our grammar in school; I am glad I am learning more now

Labhrás wrote:
And in modern syntax theories, subject and object are arguments of the predicate, both not being part of it.

Which certainly makes more sense

Labhrás wrote:
These terms aren't different in English and German (and Irish, except that "is" isn't really a verb in Irish but a particle).

Yes, as I know you are aware, in English we of course have unique 'linking verbs' that do not have a subject and object, but rather two equal things, which I did not know how to refer to. I shall henceforth call them the subject and the 'predicative'

I will say that in English these days people more and more stray from what I would call traditional English grammar in these situations.
People say things like "This is her" or "Me and him are coming" that sound totally crazy to my ears
People also say things like "Never say 'I am good' only 'I am well'" which are completely wrong, at least by the old rules...

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