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PostPosted: Sat 31 Mar 2018 8:31 am 
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Joined: Sat 31 Mar 2018 8:01 am
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Hi there,

I was hoping someone could help me?

I've doing some searching online to find the Irish Gaelic translation for, "What doesn't kill you, makes you stronger".

Most results lead to this translation - "An rud nach maraíonn thú, neartaíonn sé thú".

However, an Irish work colleague insists the most natural translation is, as it would be said in spoken Irish Gaelic - "Neartaíonn sin nach maraíonn". Which translates to in English as, "What does not kill, strengthens".

Can someone please confirm (or deny) that, Neartaíonn sin nach maraíonn, does indeed mean this?

Thank you


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PostPosted: Sat 31 Mar 2018 9:39 am 
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Joined: Sat 03 May 2014 4:01 pm
Posts: 917
fhionntain wrote:
Hi there,

I was hoping someone could help me?

I've doing some searching online to find the Irish Gaelic translation for, "What doesn't kill you, makes you stronger".

Most results lead to this translation - "An rud nach maraíonn thú, neartaíonn sé thú".

However, an Irish work colleague insists the most natural translation is, as it would be said in spoken Irish Gaelic - "Neartaíonn sin nach maraíonn". Which translates to in English as, "What does not kill, strengthens".

Can someone please confirm (or deny) that, Neartaíonn sin nach maraíonn, does indeed mean this?

Thank you


I'm far from being a native speaker but I'd say the first sounds more natural.
And it makes more sense: The payoff (making stronger) should be last.


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PostPosted: Thu 05 Apr 2018 5:54 pm 
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Joined: Fri 09 Sep 2011 2:06 pm
Posts: 544
fhionntain wrote:

However, an Irish work colleague insists the most natural translation is, as it would be said in spoken Irish Gaelic - "Neartaíonn sin nach maraíonn". Which translates to in English as, "What does not kill, strengthens".

Can someone please confirm (or deny) that, Neartaíonn sin nach maraíonn, does indeed mean this?
Thank you



I don't think it's good Irish. I'm not a native speaker either, and I've read far less Irish than I ought to have, but that 'sin nach' looks strange and wrong to me - certainly not more natural.

It looks to me like a literal translation of 'that which' (='what') + negative verb. There are several
proverbs in Irish which follow that pattern, and all of them have 'an rud nach'.

How good an Irish speaker does your colleague claim to be?


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PostPosted: Wed 11 Apr 2018 4:15 am 
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Joined: Sat 07 Feb 2015 11:24 am
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Location: Baile Mhic Ghoilla Eoin, VA
Some alternatives (the second you gave is a no, but the first is fine):

Mura mbíonn tú maraithe, bíonn tú neartaithe

Mura maraítear, neartaítear
Mura maraítear thú, neartaítear thú

Mura mbuadh ort, buadh leat

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ЯГОН ТОҶИК НЕСТ ИНҶО???


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