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PostPosted: Tue 28 Nov 2017 1:44 am 
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Bríd Mhór wrote:
The -se/-sa makes the emphasis, there is no need to say it with stress.
I think when people do stress it differently they are copying English.

That is what I learned as well, and since Bríd is a native speaker, she would know.

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PostPosted: Tue 28 Nov 2017 2:44 pm 
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Bríd Mhór wrote:
The -se/-sa makes the emphasis, there is no need to say it with stress.
I think when people do stress it differently they are copying English.

But in the case of reading aloud to children, the whole point is to use emotion or expressiveness to attract their attention to the important part of each sentence. (Then the hungry tiger ate AALLLLL the potatoes and AALLLLL the broccoli. ...etc.) And the Scéal an Lae videos on youtube all read this way too. (But I haven't found anyone there reading out a -se/-sa sentence.)

I don't see how I can read Mammy Bear's line without emphasising something about possession. When I try, it's really boring and I sound like a computer :)

I've kept looking for audio examples and I found Buntús Cainte lesson 76 dialogue. "Tá sé chomh glan le do cheannsa". Like the second Ros na Rún example, it kinda sounds like the noun ("cheann") part is emphasised, if anything. The examples I found haven't helped much, but FWIW the score is: 1 emphasising the possessive adjective, 2 slightly emphasising the noun, 2 emphasising nothing, and none emphasising the -se/-sa. But none were about reading aloud to children.

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PostPosted: Tue 28 Nov 2017 4:11 pm 
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Our man in Brussels wrote:
Bríd Mhór wrote:
The -se/-sa makes the emphasis, there is no need to say it with stress.
I think when people do stress it differently they are copying English.

But in the case of reading aloud to children, the whole point is to use emotion or expressiveness to attract their attention to the important part of each sentence. (Then the hungry tiger ate AALLLLL the potatoes and AALLLLL the broccoli. ...etc.) And the Scéal an Lae videos on youtube all read this way too. (But I haven't found anyone there reading out a -se/-sa sentence.)

I don't see how I can read Mammy Bear's line without emphasising something about possession. When I try, it's really boring and I sound like a computer :)


You can only aggravate something in reading to children which already exists. But stress in "mo" doesn't exist.
In Irish emphasis (or better: contrast) is realized by an extra syllable: mo leite -> mo leitese not by stress.
So, you should probably aggravate this polysyllabism: mo-lei-te-se: Féach ar mo-lei-te-se (Look at my porridge (not at yours/his/hers ... I'm not very familiar with the three bears)


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PostPosted: Wed 29 Nov 2017 4:07 am 
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Labhrás wrote:
So, you should probably aggravate this polysyllabism: mo-lei-te-se: Féach ar mo-lei-te-se (Look at my porridge (not at yours/his/hers ... I'm not very familiar with the three bears)

brilliant!!! when you say it you wonder why didn't I think of that? it works perfectly!!

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PostPosted: Wed 29 Nov 2017 1:07 pm 
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Labhrás wrote:
You can only aggravate something in reading to children which already exists. But stress in "mo" doesn't exist.
In Irish emphasis (or better: contrast) is realized by an extra syllable: mo leite -> mo leitese not by stress.
So, you should probably aggravate this polysyllabism: mo-lei-te-se: Féach ar mo-lei-te-se (Look at my porridge (not at yours/his/hers ... I'm not very familiar with the three bears)

Ok, I'll try this.

Just to be clear, I fully accept that you (plural) are right about this. My follow-up comment was just to say that I'm struggling to imagine what this would sound like. But now that I know more about -se/-sa and stress, I'll keep it in mind when listening to recordings of children's stories. If I find that sort of example, I'll post it here so that it might help others with the same question in the future.

Thanks to everyone who commented!

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PostPosted: Wed 29 Nov 2017 10:31 pm 
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Yes in French it would - moi je.... srl - or - C'est moi qui..... which I think I'm right in saying, you can do the same in Irish - isn't it called fronting ? Is mise a ......srl


On peut très bien accentuer "je" aussi...

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