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PostPosted: Mon 20 Nov 2017 8:58 pm 
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Dear all

I know just a very little of Irish and now I wanna get some tattoo. The phrase is "There always will be the summer"
Is that a right translation "Beidh an samhradh ann i gcónaí" or "Beidh an tsamhraidh ann i gcónaí?
Or better to say "Beidh an samhradh i gcónaí" as a shorter option with a same meaning?

(Besides, I know both words in Irish - summer and always, but never dipped into future tenses)

Also I don't know how to pronounce word "beidh" ( it is not on teanglann or focloir), will appreciate if someone gives me a clue.

Go raibh maith agaibh!
Xena


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PostPosted: Tue 21 Nov 2017 12:09 am 
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gwennol wrote:
Is that a right translation "Beidh an samhradh ann i gcónaí" or "Beidh an tsamhraidh ann i gcónaí?
Or better to say "Beidh an samhradh i gcónaí" as a shorter option with a same meaning?


Of these three, I believe only the first (original) works: Beidh an samhradh ann i gcónaí
It means "It will be summer forever," to my understanding

The second option is wrong because "an tsamhraidh" means "of summer" instead of just "the summer" which is "an samhradh"
The third option to me seems to leave you hanging... the summer will always be what?? hot? long?

However, I think your original English sentence was meant to mean something more like "as bad as it is now, there will be a summer coming eventually" or the like
Is that correct? If so, I don't think this translation really works.

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PostPosted: Tue 21 Nov 2017 8:13 am 
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Cúmhaí, many thanks for you help!

This is strange that is not the same meaning in Irish. In other 2 languages I know, "There always will be the summer" means also "as bad as it is now, there will be a summer coming eventually".


The phrase is very simple that's why I have chosen it. What will be the right translation of "as bad as it is now, there will be a summer coming eventually" to Irish then?

GRMA,
Xena


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PostPosted: Wed 22 Nov 2017 7:07 pm 
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gwennol wrote:
Cúmhaí, many thanks for you help!

This is strange that is not the same meaning in Irish. In other 2 languages I know, "There always will be the summer" means also "as bad as it is now, there will be a summer coming eventually".


The phrase is very simple that's why I have chosen it. What will be the right translation of "as bad as it is now, there will be a summer coming eventually" to Irish then?

GRMA,
Xena

Part of the problem has to do with the use (or non-use) of the definite article ("the" in English). Some languages have both a definite and an indefinite article ("a" in English). Irish has only the definite article, and some languages have neither. The usage of the article can also vary by language. In some cases where English uses the definite article, Irish does not, and vice versa, so if the article carries extra meaning, it can't always be used to do that in the other language.

I think the best way to convey what you want is with a different verb:

Tiocfaidh an samhradh i gcónaí
Summer will always come
or else
Tagann an samhradh i gcónaí
Summer always comes

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I'm not a native (or entirely fluent) speaker, so be sure to wait for confirmations/corrections, especially for tattoos.


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PostPosted: Thu 23 Nov 2017 12:03 am 
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gwennol wrote:
This is strange that is not the same meaning in Irish. In other 2 languages I know, "There always will be the summer" means also "as bad as it is now, there will be a summer coming eventually".


Dear gwennol,

It seems you have misunderstood what I meant.
Obviously if the meaning is "There always will be the summer" it will also mean "as bad as it is now, there will be a summer coming eventually" because these two convey the same meaning.

But I don't believe that what you had provided meant either of these; rather I believe it meant "It will be summer forever" as I indicated.

I hope that makes better sense

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PostPosted: Thu 23 Nov 2017 12:08 am 
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CaoimhínSF wrote:
I think the best way to convey what you want is with a different verb:

Tiocfaidh an samhradh i gcónaí
Summer will always come
or else
Tagann an samhradh i gcónaí
Summer always comes


These may be better choice

We could also try something more poetic / Irish sounding:
Níl bliain nach dtagann a samhradh
There is no year but that comes its summer/
There is no year whose summer does not come

Not sure if that works or not, but I like it hahaha

Definitely wait for more feedback before proceeding!

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PostPosted: Thu 23 Nov 2017 9:36 am 
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Cúmhaí, CaoimhínSF

Many thanks for your replies and advises!

I think the best choice for me is
Tagann an samhradh i gcónaí,
especially I can understand, spell and pronounce every word in this phrase on my own. For beginners always better to choose the simplest option (even Cúmhaí's poetic sentence is very nice and I like it).

I will appreciate if maybe someone give me feedback on this phrase :)

GRMA
Xena


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PostPosted: Fri 24 Nov 2017 7:07 pm 
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Except when you live in Ireland. We never know if summer is ever going to come again.


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PostPosted: Tue 28 Nov 2017 1:10 pm 
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Haha)
I've been to Ireland so I understand :)

Thank you!


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PostPosted: Tue 28 Nov 2017 3:40 pm 
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Bríd Mhór wrote:
Except when you live in Ireland. We never know if summer is ever going to come again.


There was one in 2009, wasn't there? I think I remember one in 1997 or '98 too.


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