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PostPosted: Thu 08 Jun 2017 6:11 am 
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Joined: Thu 08 Jun 2017 5:40 am
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Hello,

I'm writing a story that takes place in Ireland and I wanted to make sure that I was using some basic phrases and words correctly. I only know a few things that I have questions on this moment, so I might need some assistance as I go on.

My first question is do people in Ireland say "mate" for friend? I've seen some where “a chara” was used, but then how would that be formatted in a sentence? For example. "Let me introduce you to some of my 'friends'.

I am used to Scottish phrases like lass. Do those also work for Irish? For instance, a bartender asking "What can I get you, lass?" Or would this be asked a different way?

What would be a term for hooking-up/getting some action. "He's here for two hours and already hooking-up."

I appreciate any help.


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PostPosted: Thu 08 Jun 2017 6:20 am 
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Joined: Sun 28 Aug 2011 8:44 pm
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Location: Santa Cruz Mountains, California, USA
violetoak wrote:
Hello,

I'm writing a story that takes place in Ireland and I wanted to make sure that I was using some basic phrases and words correctly. I only know a few things that I have questions on this moment, so I might need some assistance as I go on.

My first question is do people in Ireland say "mate" for friend? I've seen some where “a chara” was used, but then how would that be formatted in a sentence? For example. "Let me introduce you to some of my 'friends'.

I am used to Scottish phrases like lass. Do those also work for Irish? For instance, a bartender asking "What can I get you, lass?" Or would this be asked a different way?

What would be a term for hooking-up/getting some action. "He's here for two hours and already hooking-up."

I appreciate any help.


Are you looking for words in the Irish language? The thing is, Irish works very differently from English, so just knowing a word here and there isn't going to help you much.

"Mate" is in English, and I'm sure the Irish use it sometimes too, when they're speaking English. "A chara" is the vocative form of the word for "friend" in Irish, but typically people wouldn't use it if they were speaking English.

"Hooking up" doesn't have a cognate in Irish, as far as I know.

Wait for more.

Redwolf


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PostPosted: Fri 09 Jun 2017 12:48 am 
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Joined: Thu 08 Jun 2017 5:40 am
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That's why I was asking about the sentences. I don't just want to throw in Irish words without the right context for for the sake of doing it. I'm sure I could get by fine writing is all in American English, but I when I was writing things with said by a Scotsman, I added "Laddy" and such were it was appropriate. I just wanted to be able to do the same thing. The sentences I provided are from my story. I am not looking for a word-to-word translation, because I know it doesn't work that way. I would like for it to sound authentic enough for anyone who is Irish to be able to say "she got it right."


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PostPosted: Fri 09 Jun 2017 2:09 pm 
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Joined: Sat 03 May 2014 4:01 pm
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violetoak wrote:
"Let me introduce you to some of my 'friends'.


Lig dom thú a chur in aithne do chuid de mo chairde.
(Let me introduce you to some of my friends.)
Lig dom cuid de mo chairde a chur in aithne duit.
(Let me introduce some of my friends to you.)

cairde = friends

violetoak wrote:
"He's here for two hours and already hooking-up."


Tá sé anseo le dhá uair agus é ag iarraidh dul amach (liom / léi / le duine éigin) cheana féin.
(He's here for two hours and already trying to hook (me / her / somebody) up)


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PostPosted: Tue 13 Jun 2017 12:06 pm 
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Location: Cill Dara
Just for clarification, are you looking for Irish words/terms or English words/terms that Irish people might use when speaking English?

Also,Irish people don't generally use the term 'mate'; I would much more associate it with English people.

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Is foghlaimeoir mé. I am a learner. DEFINITELY wait for others to confirm and/or improve.
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