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PostPosted: Mon 21 Nov 2011 2:57 am 
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I've seen this in a coupla places and have been wondering about it. Any ideas?

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PostPosted: Mon 21 Nov 2011 3:11 am 
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.i. (eadhon) "i.e."/"that is"

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My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Mon 21 Nov 2011 3:30 am 
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Thanks for the fast reply, Breandán! I was leaning in that direction, but wanted confirmation.

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"What? First we give a month to black history, now we're blowing seven days on the Irish!"
Pierce, upon hearing about Green Week


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PostPosted: Mon 21 Nov 2011 11:22 am 
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There's a short paragraph about abreviations in Irish on the Wikipedia page on Irish orthography.
Here it is - Abbreviations
Irish has a number of abbreviations, most of which, like - lch. for leathanach ("p"/"page") and - m.sh for mar shampla ("e.g."/"for example") are straightforward. Two that may require explanation are .i. (which begins and ends with a full stop) eadhon ("i.e."/"that is") and 7rl or srl for agus araile ("etc."/"and so forth" - etcetera).


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PostPosted: Mon 21 Nov 2011 1:57 pm 
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Thanks, franc91. I'd seen these others, especially 7rl, but .i. is puzzling. Wonder if it's related to "is".

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"What? First we give a month to black history, now we're blowing seven days on the Irish!"
Pierce, upon hearing about Green Week


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PostPosted: Mon 21 Nov 2011 2:03 pm 
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If it's an "i" or "i.e." that is used as an abbreviation there, it's because it's the abbreviation of Latin "id est", which means "(that) is" or "it is".

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Agus is í Gaeilg Ġaoṫ Doḃair is binne
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PostPosted: Mon 21 Nov 2011 5:36 pm 
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Like so many other abbreviations that derive from clerical scriptures (in both Irish and English, and other languages for that matter), .i. comes from the Latin abbreviation (id est in this case), and it was not limited to just Irish texts. I.e. and .i. were originally just two variations of the same abbreviation, with i.e. made in what is to us today a very logical manner, using the initials of each word; and .i. made in another quite common manner in Latin: taking a disyllabic word or expression that begins with VCV and writing just that first consonant surrounded by dots to represent the vowels—originally, I believe most commonly as ·i·, but later on, .i. became the standard).

Irish seems to be the only language (that I know of, at least) that ended up favouring .i. over i.e., but in Carolingian times, both were used in most parts of Europe.

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Always wait for at least three people to agree on a translation, especially if it’s for something permanent.

My translations are usually GU (Ulster Irish), unless CO (Standard Orthography) is requested.


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PostPosted: Mon 21 Nov 2011 7:20 pm 
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There was a time when I thought that a.m. (ante meridiem) actually stood for 'ar maidin'. Made perfect sense to me......

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PostPosted: Mon 21 Nov 2011 9:16 pm 
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In my dictionary they give the equivalent of a.m. as - r.n. and p.m. as - i. - but I don't know what they stand for. Dála an scéil, A.D. is given as I.C. - Iar-Chríost and B.C. as R.Ch. - Roimh Chríost (why don't they put Ch in the first one, I don't know)


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PostPosted: Mon 21 Nov 2011 9:23 pm 
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franc 91 wrote:
In my dictionary they give the equivalent of a.m. as - r.n. and p.m. as - i. - but I don't know what they stand for. Dála an scéil, A.D. is given as I.C. - Iar-Chríost and B.C. as R.Ch. - Roimh Chríost (why don't they put Ch in the first one, I don't know)

R.n. = roimh nóin.
I.n. = iar nóin

Ba cheart go mbeadh ‘i.gC.’ ann chun AD a aistriú, mar leanann an t-urú an réamhfhocal ‘iar’ (‘iar gCríost(a)’).

Ach b’fhearr liom CR (Comh-Ré) agus RCR (Roimh Chomh-Ré) a úsáid, mar ní chreidim i nDia ná i gCríosta ar aon nós. :mrgreen:

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Not a native speaker.

Always wait for at least three people to agree on a translation, especially if it’s for something permanent.

My translations are usually GU (Ulster Irish), unless CO (Standard Orthography) is requested.


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