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PostPosted: Wed 12 Oct 2011 10:26 pm 
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I'm looking for confirmation of the translation of the above phrase, which I have as:

Smacht a fháil ar do chostais fhuinneamh geimhridh ?


Can anyone tell me if this is okay, and better still, why?

Austin

P.S. Go raibh maith agat, in advance.


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PostPosted: Wed 12 Oct 2011 11:39 pm 
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I think "Smacht a fháil ar do chostais fhuinneamh geimhridh" is more like "Getting control of your winter energy costs." Close, but in the wrong tense. At the very least it would need to be fáigh smacht ar "Get control of". A different verb like cuir smacht ar, might be even better.

"your winter energy costs" is full of nested genitives and I might leave that to someone else to untangle ... :bolt:

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WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Thu 13 Oct 2011 12:27 am 
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Breandán wrote:
"your winter energy costs" is full of nested genitives and I might leave that to someone else to untangle ... :bolt:

Yeah, the genitives are backwards here:

Costais fhuinneamh geimhridh means ‘the costs of winter energy’, i.e., how much ‘winter energy’ (whatever exactly that may be, as opposed to ‘summer energy’) costs you.

Costais fhuinnimh gheimhridh, on the other hand, means ‘energy costs of winter’, i.e., how much the energy costs you in wintertime, which makes more sense.

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Not a native speaker.

Always wait for at least three people to agree on a translation, especially if it’s for something permanent.

My translations are usually GU (Ulster Irish), unless CO (Standard Orthography) is requested.


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PostPosted: Thu 13 Oct 2011 12:38 am 
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That's great, kk, but only half done. ;)

How do we put "your" onto that? do? do chuid (because the noun is plural)? na (to avoid the problem and be more idiomatically Irish)?

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WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Thu 13 Oct 2011 12:53 am 
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Breandán wrote:
That's great, kk, but only half done. ;)

How do we put "your" onto that? do? do chuid (because the noun is plural)? na (to avoid the problem and be more idiomatically Irish)?

Good point.

Na would be simpler here, but I don’t think it would necessarily be more idiomatic in this context—the two seem in my head equally okay.

If using a possessive adjective, though, you’re right that we should add cuid, that sounds better. Which of course changes quite a bit of the rest of it:

Cuir smacht ar do chuid costas fuinnimh gheimhridh (if you’re addressing one person)
Cuirigí smacht ar bhur gcuid costas fuinnimh gheimhridh (if you’re addressing more than one person)


Edit: Actually … now I’m starting to doubt myself here. My gut reaction says that cuid, being a quantity word, doesn’t contain enough ‘genitive signal’ to cause the following genitive to become a ‘nominative instead of genitive’. But I’m not so sure.

Should it perhaps be do chuid/bhur gcuid chostais fhuinnimh gheimhridh after all?

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Not a native speaker.

Always wait for at least three people to agree on a translation, especially if it’s for something permanent.

My translations are usually GU (Ulster Irish), unless CO (Standard Orthography) is requested.


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PostPosted: Thu 13 Oct 2011 6:01 am 
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Go raibh míle maith agaibh as bhúr gcabhair.
Bhéinn buí as ceartúcháin freisin.

However, not sure what to go with now. The translation needs to be in the Caighdeán Oifigiúl(CO)

Slán Tamaill

Austin


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PostPosted: Thu 13 Oct 2011 6:03 am 
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I meant to say 'Buíoch', but it's a bit early in the morning.
Nílim buí, ach an oiread.

Austin


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PostPosted: Thu 13 Oct 2011 10:45 am 
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I don't know how to say this in Irish, so I don't want to confuse the issue by trying, but would it be possible to say "Take control of the costs of your (share of) winter energy" - and would that make it any easier to sort out all the genitives?

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I'm only a learner, so please help me by correcting my mistakes - I won't be offended!


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PostPosted: Thu 13 Oct 2011 10:51 am 
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Joined: Thu 01 Sep 2011 9:55 am
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Location: 91 - France
http://www.esb.ie/esbcustomersupply/ene ... splanc.htm
Fuinneamh - An Dushlán


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PostPosted: Thu 13 Oct 2011 4:49 pm 
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franc 91 wrote:
http://www.esb.ie/esbcustomersupply/energychallenge/splanc.htm
Fuinneamh - An Dushlán

Thanks, Franc. :wave: Unfortunately another beautifully designed web page spoilt by a crappy pseudo-Irish accent. :S

_________________

WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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