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PostPosted: Tue 11 Oct 2011 5:59 pm 
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I would like to have this saying translated to Irish so I can get it tattooed with a Celtic cross...the saying I want is break the rules, stand apart, ignore your head, follow your heart. I greatly appreciate all the help I can get...thank you in advance :D


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PostPosted: Tue 11 Oct 2011 6:50 pm 
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This is a follow up to something we have been working on at IGTF:

http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/tr ... 07734.html

kokoshneta had proposed the following translation:

Bris na rialacha; seas leat féin;
ná tabhair aird ar do chionn; lean le do chroí

But there were questions raised about the use of cionn versus ceann and the use of lean le versus lean.

Any suggestions regarding kk's translation?

I think lean le rud is to "continue with sth" rather than to "follow sth" and cionn is mostly reserved for set expressions. Perhaps:

Bris na rialacha; seas leat féin;
seachain do cheann; lean do chroí

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WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Tue 11 Oct 2011 8:15 pm 
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I usually use na rialacha a shárú as opposed to na rialacha a bhriseadh. Is this down to preference only?


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PostPosted: Tue 11 Oct 2011 8:25 pm 
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Gumbi wrote:
I usually use na rialacha a shárú as opposed to na rialacha a bhriseadh. Is this down to preference only?

I'd translate sárú as "violate" rather than just "break".

FGB has riail a bhriseadh "to break a rule" under riail, and riail a shárú "to infringe a rule" under sáraigh.

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WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Tue 11 Oct 2011 8:42 pm 
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Breandán wrote:
But there were questions raised about the use of cionn versus ceann and the use of lean le versus lean.

Being now at home, and in a position to look things up, I’d have to agree that the le shouldn’t be there. I’m not sure if it’s something I’ve just somehow (and incorrectly) taught myself, or if it’s something that actually works in colloquial Ulster Irish; but better safe than sorry. And FGB gives the right meanings (to follow a rule, a master, guidance, the fashion, etc.) under lean itself, with no preposition.

Breandán wrote:
Bris na rialacha; seas leat féin;
seachain do cheann; lean do chroí

I’d read seachain do cheann as ‘avoid your head’, something most people would probably find a bit hard to do. :razz:

I’ve never heard seachain used to mean ‘ignore’ or ‘not give heed to’; only ‘avoid’ and ‘guard X against Y’ (with ar).

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Not a native speaker.

Always wait for at least three people to agree on a translation, especially if it’s for something permanent.

My translations are usually GU (Ulster Irish), unless CO (Standard Orthography) is requested.


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PostPosted: Tue 11 Oct 2011 9:09 pm 
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Seachain do cheann actually means "mind your head" or "watch your head" but I think it can also be taken to mean "beware of your head" (even without the ar).

I think it beats any of the convoluted expressions required to achieve "ignore" in Irish, though there may still be better ways to avoid "ignore".

_________________

WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Tue 11 Oct 2011 9:56 pm 
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Bris na rialacha; seas leat féin;
diúltaigh d'imfhios, lean do chroí

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PostPosted: Fri 14 Oct 2011 5:43 pm 
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I appreciate all the help and suggestions, just wanted to know if anyone had a final translation...thanks in advance!!!


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PostPosted: Fri 14 Oct 2011 7:27 pm 
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Tiarnan wrote:
Bris na rialacha; seas leat féin;
diúltaigh d'imfhios, lean do chroí

What Tiarnan gave you means:
"break the rules, stand apart,
refuse your intuition, follow your heart."

De Bhaldraithe has imfhios; FGB refers that to iomas. I have an image of "intuition" also being a heart thing.

Can we get away with just diúltaigh do cheann "Refuse/deny your head" instead? or is there a better alternative to imfhios/iomas (if that doesn't already suit ashes013086)?

_________________

WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Fri 14 Oct 2011 9:02 pm 
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I dont think ceann works in Irish...conjures up all kinds of gory and salacious images (imho)
How about meabhair ..(intellect)...if you dont care for my other brainstorm :LOL:

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Image

Nuair a shuíonn an coileach péacoige ar a thóin, níl ann ach turcaí
Chief Buffalo Breath
===========================


Wisdom is never on the menu, you have to own the restaurant.


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