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PostPosted: Sat 24 Sep 2011 1:15 pm 
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Joined: Wed 07 Sep 2011 5:05 pm
Posts: 422
Bríd Mhór wrote:
"dw i'n barod" = I'm ready

Hey, I understood that! :D

(I have a song that contains the line rwy’n barod i’r siwrne)

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Not a native speaker.

Always wait for at least three people to agree on a translation, especially if it’s for something permanent.

My translations are usually GU (Ulster Irish), unless CO (Standard Orthography) is requested.


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PostPosted: Sun 09 Oct 2011 2:10 pm 
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Joined: Fri 02 Sep 2011 11:31 pm
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Location: Navasota, Texas USA
Redwolf: you started an interesting discussion. I wanted to share a break through I've had in the last couple of weeks. I went to a Celtic Festival near Austin and I bought a tiny book called "Fionn mac Cumhall" by Tadhg Mac Dhonnagáin. It is a kid's book (maybe for 8-9 year olds). I love it because it is just a little bit above my level of speaking, reading, etc. I liked it so much I ordered the 4 little book set with the CD last week from Litriocht. I have been reading each chapter slowly, writing down new sentence structures that I don't know, and then using those words and structures in Skype conversations in the following week. It is amazing how much it is helping me. I am dreaming the phrases and words. In the past I have felt defeated trying to read much because my speaking/reading ability is just so low that I spend all my time trying to understand each word, looking them all up etc. and then I'm lost in the morass of it all. I think also, just adding the few things I don't know helps my mind into understanding the whole thought and structure of what I am reading. It is really quite exciting and is one of those kind of breakthroughs that we talk about here.

Also, I take the time each week to type out the book so I can get used to spelling what I am saying. The only confusion for me is that the book seems to uru things that seem different than in Ulster Irish. (I submitted that piece to you all one time and my spelling of cailín was corrected over and over like gcailín and it looked unfamiliar to me). I think I've heard you guys saying that Connemara Irish follows some different patterns on that than the Ulster Irish that I see more often. Anyway.....this is sort of a breakthrough for me and I can see it expanding my vocabulary exponentially. I just thought I'd mention it as it may be a technique that will work for someone else.

Slán anois, agus go raibh mile maith agaibh as an chuidiú a thabhairt domh i gconai,
Féabar


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PostPosted: Sun 09 Oct 2011 8:58 pm 
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Joined: Mon 29 Aug 2011 4:54 pm
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Location: Cill Dara
faberm wrote:
I went to a Celtic Festival near Austin and I bought a tiny book called "Fionn mac Cumhall" by Tadhg Mac Dhonnagáin. It is a kid's book (maybe for 8-9 year olds). I love it because it is just a little bit above my level of speaking, reading, etc. I liked it so much I ordered the 4 little book set with the CD last week from Litriocht.


Tadhg Mac Dhonnagáin and Futa Fata have absolutely brilliant children's books and cds. In fact, a link to Futa Fata's website was one of the first links to be put up on our new forum here.

viewtopic.php?f=4&t=24

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Is foghlaimeoir mé. I am a learner. DEFINITELY wait for others to confirm and/or improve.
Beatha teanga í a labhairt.


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PostPosted: Mon 10 Oct 2011 12:09 pm 
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Joined: Mon 05 Sep 2011 10:43 am
Posts: 246
Location: BÁC, Éire
Fuair mé leabhar páiste anuraidh ón leabharlann, bhí sé ro-dheacair domsa :prof:

I too go through periods of learning loads and then nothing for ages, which is why 3 years on I have only basic conversation but Im ok at reading now. I just keep plugging away lá go lá and one day le cuidiú Dé, beidh Gaeilge agam.


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PostPosted: Mon 10 Oct 2011 1:28 pm 
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Joined: Fri 02 Sep 2011 11:31 pm
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Location: Navasota, Texas USA
Somhairle Óg:

If you ever want, I can send you an email of one of the chapters (in the kids book) I've typed out and I could help you get through it and understand why it says what it says. The key is for you to NOT be embarrassed about where you are or where you are not in your Irish. Just celebrate what you do know and don't beat up on yourself. You could then spend a couple of weeks, use what new words and phrases you learn, and put it into a conversation with me. Let me know. I Skype regularly. I had Skype sessions yesterday with a friend in Manooth for an hour, and then a couple of friends in Dublin for an hour after that. I then gave a girl in San Diego a basic basic intro to Irish to help motivate her to carry on (she studied for a year and can't say much more than hello, etc) It was productive and fun for all of us. (I hope anyway!!) :guiness:


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PostPosted: Mon 10 Oct 2011 8:50 pm 
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Joined: Mon 05 Sep 2011 10:43 am
Posts: 246
Location: BÁC, Éire
Sounds good, if you could do that it'd be a big help, I saw your skype on here (or Daltaí?) I added you, I'm not on it often but if I see you I'll say hi. I'll send you my email via private message.
:GRMA:


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PostPosted: Tue 11 Oct 2011 12:30 am 
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Joined: Fri 02 Sep 2011 11:31 pm
Posts: 249
Location: Navasota, Texas USA
Please email me at [e-mail address removed for user protection - PM Faber directly for details] I find it more fruitful to arrange a Skype time and we can just do it.

Let me know
Faberm


Last edited by Breandán on Sun 20 Nov 2011 11:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Edited to remove private contact details.


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PostPosted: Mon 07 Nov 2011 1:58 pm 
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Joined: Thu 27 Oct 2011 7:19 am
Posts: 13
Just wanted to say, Redwolf, that I can relate to all of what you described. It's nice to hear that you're not the only one with this experience, yeah? It is for me.
-Forgetting how to spell words I know I used to know how to spell
-Having to look up a word over and over again, then still not retaining its meaning
-Times when understanding comes and goes...
I'm 58 yrs old. I've been studying the Irish for 6 years now, going to a weekly class and doing a lot of studying on my own at home. And I experience these same phenomena often. I think a lot of it is due to getting older and the memory not being as good, retention being more challenging, concentration being compromised by all the other stuff that's going on at the time and/or just in one's life, etc.
It can be pretty frustrating-- at least it is to me.
So I wanted to chime in here and tell yuo that you're not the lone ranger here.
We just need to keep at it, keep the passion for learning the Irish alive in our hearts and "aging minds"!, and appreciate those light bulb moments.
Slán anois.
CheerioTexas


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