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PostPosted: Fri 25 Jan 2013 9:32 pm 
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Read here for some information about this resource.

viewtopic.php?f=36&t=1870

If anyone has used this resource, feel free to comment here. When someone is trying to decide which resource would best suit his/her needs, it can be useful to hear what others think.

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PostPosted: Fri 25 Jan 2013 10:21 pm 
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While I've obviously not used Bitesize as a beginner, it brings several things to the table that I think a beginner would find useful:

1) The lessons are designed to be very short, easily assimilated "bites," which keeps them from being too overwhelming.
2) They're developed from the perspective of someone who is learning Irish in Ireland, as well as of someone who is experienced with on-line learning.
3) They're very audio-rich.
4) The program is very reasonably priced, and pretty much risk-free (when you're just dipping your toe into learning a language, that's really a big factor)
5) The program is constantly growing and evolving.

What I especially like about this format for conversational lessons (vs language tapes or CDs) is you can speak at your own pace, without worrying about whether you'll have enough time before the next track.

A feature that was recently added to the conversation lessons was "normal speed" recording. So you first hear the conversation spoken slowly and distinctly, then at normal, conversational, speed. You then take turns role playing each of the speakers. Finally, you get a chance to insert your own information into the conversation.

Also recently added: a series of memorization lessons on the 11 irregular verbs.

Grammar and spelling tend to be more or less standard. Pronunciation is Munster (Kerry)

And, in the interest of full disclosure, I'm the "Audrey" mentioned in the description.

Redwolf


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PostPosted: Fri 25 Jan 2013 11:13 pm 
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Quote:
Grammar and spelling tend to be more or less standard. Pronunciation is Munster (Kerry)


:darklaugh:
what next? Munster grammar with Donegal pronunciation? :mrgreen:
That means they create pronunciations, because there are many standard forms that don't exist in Kerry...

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PostPosted: Sat 26 Jan 2013 12:31 am 
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Lughaidh wrote:
Quote:
Grammar and spelling tend to be more or less standard. Pronunciation is Munster (Kerry)


:darklaugh:
what next? Munster grammar with Donegal pronunciation? :mrgreen:
That means they create pronunciations, because there are many standard forms that don't exist in Kerry...


If you're going to use standardized grammar, I don't see that you have any choice. The caighdeán doesn't deal with pronunciation.


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PostPosted: Sat 26 Jan 2013 1:01 am 
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They'd rather use Connemara Irish pronunciation, it's the least different from the standard (compared to Munster and Donegal Irish)...

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Agus is í Gaeilg Ġaoṫ Doḃair is binne
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PostPosted: Sat 26 Jan 2013 2:04 am 
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Redwolf wrote:
Grammar and spelling tend to be more or less standard. Pronunciation is Munster (Kerry)

Just so that people who actually want to study Munster or Kerry Irish aren't misled, Bitesize Irish Gaelic is not really Munster Irish. It is more like school Irish in both grammar and pronunciation.

Eoin claims to be a native speaker but he has a school Irish accent. His accent has been improving over the years and he should describe himself truthfully and honestly as a fluent speaker, rather than as a native speaker.

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WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Sat 26 Jan 2013 2:20 am 
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Breandán wrote:
Redwolf wrote:
Grammar and spelling tend to be more or less standard. Pronunciation is Munster (Kerry)

Just so that people who actually want to study Munster or Kerry Irish aren't misled, Bitesize Irish Gaelic is not really Munster Irish. It is more like school Irish in both grammar and pronunciation.

Eoin claims to be a native speaker but he has a school Irish accent. His accent has been improving over the years and he should describe himself truthfully and honestly as a fluent speaker, rather than as a native speaker.


As I said, standard grammar, Munster pronunciation.

Pretty much like Rosetta Stone in that respect.

Eoin was raised in an Irish-speaking household. Since when do people have to justify saying they're native speakers of the language they grew up speaking?

Redwolf


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PostPosted: Sat 26 Jan 2013 2:34 am 
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Redwolf wrote:
Breandán wrote:
Redwolf wrote:
Grammar and spelling tend to be more or less standard. Pronunciation is Munster (Kerry)

Just so that people who actually want to study Munster or Kerry Irish aren't misled, Bitesize Irish Gaelic is not really Munster Irish. It is more like school Irish in both grammar and pronunciation.

Eoin claims to be a native speaker but he has a school Irish accent. His accent has been improving over the years and he should describe himself truthfully and honestly as a fluent speaker, rather than as a native speaker.


As I said, standard grammar, Munster pronunciation.

Pretty much like Rosetta Stone in that respect.

Eoin was raised in an Irish-speaking household. Since when do people have to justify saying they're native speakers of the language they grew up speaking?

Redwolf

When their accent isn't a native Irish accent, but rather an anglicised school Irish one.

Eoin's accent isn't Munster Irish - it is school Irish with a few token Munster endings.

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WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Sat 26 Jan 2013 12:05 pm 
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Quote:
Eoin was raised in an Irish-speaking household.
if thats the case i would consider him a native speaker and know a lot of people who would also


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PostPosted: Sat 26 Jan 2013 12:53 pm 
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Cliathach wrote:
Quote:
Eoin was raised in an Irish-speaking household.
if thats the case i would consider him a native speaker and know a lot of people who would also

You would be quite wrong by any reasonable definition of "native" and so would they.

Native speakers of Irish use traditional Irish phonemes. Creole speakers use anglicised phonemes. You cannot become a native Irish speaker if the Irish in the "Irish-speaking household" is creole. Unless at least one person is aware of and uses the traditional phonemes, you will at best become a speaker of the creole, not of Irish.

Whatever his background, the fact is that Eoin doesn't have a native accent. It is very much a second language accent.

I think Eoin's approach and formatting are fantastic. Small chunks are great.

However, his sample pool of speakers is way too small (at the moment it is one :LOL: ). He should employ a larger range of speakers, preferably native Gaeltacht speakers to improve the quality and breadth of his recordings.

_________________

WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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