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PostPosted: Tue 25 Dec 2012 8:56 pm 
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I'm bumping this up for the day, and to mention that, just in time for Christmas, I received the two Fiona Mackenzie CD's of Gaelic Christmas carols which I'd ordered. There are some really beautiful older songs, as well as a number of translated ones. It will take me some time to get all of the lyrics into a digital version which I can post (in the Scottish Gaelic thread), but I've added several really nice ones there for now. As a note to Irish speakers, I've found that a lot of the songs, since they use fairly easy and repetitive vocabulary, are pretty easy to understand, and Fiona Mackenzie speaks very clearly as well.

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PostPosted: Mon 31 Dec 2012 12:24 am 
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Just one last post here for this year. I found the full (I think) lyrics to the Manx carol, Oikan ayns Bethlehem, for which someone posted a sound file (or a link to it) here not long ago. It has been translated into Scottish Gaelic, so I thought I'd post the Manx, English, and Gaelic lyrics here (and also in the Scottish Gaelic Christmas music thread). The Gaelic translation (which should be pretty easy for Irish speakers to follow) makes it easier to make out the Manx.

Oikan ayns Bethlehem

Nish lhisagh shin yn feailley shoh,
y reayll lesh creeaghyn glen,
ayns cooinaghtyn jeh Yeesey Chreest,
oikan ayns Bethlehem.

Daag Eh cooyrtn sollys E Ayr,
goaill er yn dooghys ain,
ruggit jeh Moidyn ghlen gyn chron,
oikan ayns Bethlehem.

Eisht ainleyn Niau ren boggey ghoaill,
haink lesh ny naightyn hooin,
ginsh jeh Saualtagh ruggiy jiu,
oikan ayns Bethlehem.

Nagh mooar yn insblid as y ghraih,
v'ayns Yeesey Chreest yn Eayn,
tra ghow Eh er cummey harvaant,
oikan ayns Bethlehem.

Ard gloyr da Jee 'syn yrjid heose,
ta reill ayns maynrys beayn,
aigney mie Yee nish soilhit dooin,
oikan ayns Bethlehem.


A Child in Bethlehem

Now we ought this festival,
to keep with clean hearts,
in memory of Jesus Christ,
as a child in Bethlehem.

He left the bright courts of His Father,
taking on our nature,
born of a pure virgin without blemish,
as a child in Bethlehem.

Hear the angels coming from Heaven,
singing with joy and cheer,
telling of a Savior [born] for us,
as a child in Bethlehem.

How great the humility and the love,
which was in Jesus Christ the Lamb,
when he took on the form of a servant,
as a child in Bethlehem.

Great Glory to God in the heights above,
who rules in everlasting happiness,
the goodwill of God now shown to us
as a child in Bethlehem.

Scottish Gaelic translation:

Nis’ cumamaid latha feist’ an seo,
le cridhe direach glàn,
mar cuimhneachan do dh’Iosa Chriost’,
‘na phàist am Betlehem.

Dh’fhàg Iosa cuairt an Athair glàn,
ghabh E ar nàdur fhèin,
rugadh do Mhaighdeann fhior gun smal
‘na phàist’ am Betlehem.

Èist ris na h-Ainglean teachd o Neamh,
a’seinn le ait is mùirn,
ag innseadh mar tha Slànaighear dhuinn,
‘na phàist’ am Betlehem.

Cia mòr an toirisleachd is gràdh,
‘bh’aig Iosa Chriost’ an t-Uan,
nuair ghabh E cumadh searbhanta,
‘na phàist’ am Betlehem.

Àrd ghlòr do Dhia ‘s na h-àrdaibh shuas,
na riaghailt shona, bhuan,
a’ nochdadh aigne mhath dhuinn uil’,
‘na phaist’ am Betlehem.

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PostPosted: Thu 12 Dec 2013 3:14 pm 
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Bumping this up for this year's holiday season. I've also bumped up the Scottish Gaelic Christmas carol thread in the Gaelic section of the forum and made some additions there.

Here's an additional Christmas carol:

An Nollaig sin fadó

Fadó, fadó i mBeitheal bheag,
a deir an Briathar Beo,
do Mhuire naofa rugadh mac
an Nollaig sin fadó.

Ceol na n-aingeal ar gach taobh,
rí nua ar an bhfód!
is táimid slán ó rugadh é
an Nollaig sin fadó!

Ceol na n-aingeal ar gach taobh,
trumpaí ann go deo!
is táimid slán ó rugadh é
an Nollaig sin fadó!

Do chonaic aoirí réalt sa spéir
a shoilsigh tríd an gceo,
is chuala fuaim na n-aingeal fós
á mealladh lena gceol;

Muire ’s Seosamh ar a dturas
do ráinig óstán mór,
ní bhfuair siad áit don leanbh-bhreith,
is d’imigh leo faoi bhrón.

Ar deireadh thiar aimsíodh clúid
i stábla beag dearóíl,
’s i mainséar fuar gan teas gan só
a rugadh Mac na hÓigh’.


That Christmas Long Ago

Long, long ago in little Bethlehem
said the Lilving Word,
to Blessed Mary was born a son,
that Christmas long ago.

The music of the angels on every side,
a new king in the place,
and we are safe since he was born,
that Christmas long ago.

The music of the angels on every side,
trumpets there forever,
and we are safe since he was born,
that Christmas long ago.

Shepherds saw stars in the sky,
and lights through the mist,
and still heard the sounds of the angels,
luring them with their music.

Mary and Joseph traveling,
reached the big inn,
they received no place for the birth of the child,
and went away in sorrow.

At the end was found a spot,
in the bleak little stable,
in a cold manger without heat or comfort,
was born the Son of Man.

and here's an additional song, which is not specifically about Christmas, but is often sung at this time of year:

Ag Críost an síol

Ag Críost an síol,
ag Críost an fómhar,
i n-iothalainn Dé
go dtugtar sinn.

Ag Críost an mhuir,
ag Críost an t-iasc.
i liontaibh Dé
go gcastar sinn.

Ó fhás go haois
is ó aois go bás,
do dhá láimh a Chríost
anall tharainn.

Ó bhás go críoch,
ní críoch ach ath-fhás
i bParthas na nGrást,
go rabhaimid.


Christ’s is the seed

Christ’s is the seed,
Christ’s is the harvest,
Into God’s barn
may we be brought.

Christ’s is the sea,
Christ’s is the fish,
in the nets of God
may we be caught.

From birth to age,
and from age to death,
may your two arms, O Christ,
be around us.

From death to the end,
not the end but a rebirth,
in the Paradise of Graces,
may we be.

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PostPosted: Thu 12 Dec 2013 3:47 pm 
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What is the origin of oikan for little child in Manx?


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PostPosted: Thu 12 Dec 2013 3:50 pm 
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And yet another one, although I only have the Irish for two of the verses (maybe someone here can come up with the others). Note that the English here is the traditional English-language version, and the Irish is not a direct translation, so maybe someone would also like to come up with the actual meaning of the Irish. I haven't heard the English version for a while, so I'm not sure, but this may be sung to the same tune as the carol in the Scottish Gaelic thread entitled Bha Buachaillean an Dùthaich Shear.

Added note: See patrickjwalsh's post on page 3 for a more direct translation of the Irish.

Carúl Loch Garman / Carúl Inis Córthaidh

Verse 1:
Ó, tagaig’ uile is adhraigí,
an leanbh cneasta sa chró ‘na luí,
is cuimhnígí ar ghrá an Rí,
a thug dár saoradh anocht an Naí.
‘S a Mhuire Mháthair i bParrthas Dé,
ar chlann bhocht Éabha guigh ‘nois go caomh,
is doras an chró ná dún go deo,
go n-adhram’ feasta Mac Mhuire Ógh.


Verse 2:
Translation missing

Verse 3:
I mBeithil thoir i lár na hoích’,
ba chlos an dea-scéala d’aoirí,
go follas don saol ón spéir go binn,
bhí aingle ‘canadh ó rinn go rinn.
“Ghluaisig’ go beo,” dúirt Aingeal Dé,
“go Beithil sall is gheobhaidh sibh É,
‘na luí go séimh i mainséar féir,
siúd É an Meisias a ghráigh an saol.”


alternative two final lines for verse 3:
ina luí go ciúin i máinséar tuí,
siud é an prionsa, Mac Óg an Rí.


Wexford Carol / Enniscorthy Carol

Verse 1:
Good people all, this Christmas time,
consider well and bear in mind,
what our good God for us has done,
in sending his beloved son.
With Mary holy we should pray,
to God with love this Christmas Day,
in Bethlehem upon that morn,
there was a blessed Messiah born.

Verse 2:
The night before that happy tide,
the noble Virgin and her guide,
were long time seeking up and down,
to find a lodging in the town.
But mark right well what came to pass,
from every door repelled, alas,
as was foretold, their refuge all,
was but a humble ox’s stall.

Verse 3:
Near Bethlehem did shepherds keep,
their flocks of lambs and feeding sheep,
to whom God’s angel did appear,
which put the shepherds in great fear.
“Arise and go”, the angels said,
“to Bethlehem, be not afraid,
for there you’ll find, this happy morn,
a princely babe, sweet Jesus, born.”

Verse 4:
With thankful heart and joyful mind,
the shepherds went the babe to find,
and as God’s angel had foretold,
they did our Savior Christ behold.
Within a manger he was laid,
and by his side a virgin maid,
attending on the Lord of Life,
who came on earth to end all strife.

Verse 5:
There were three wise men from afar,
directed by a glorious star,
and on they wandered night and day,
until they came where Jesus lay.
And when they came unto that place,
where our beloved Messiah lay,
they humbly cast them at his feet,
with gifts of gold and incense sweet.

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I'm not a native (or entirely fluent) speaker, so be sure to wait for confirmations/corrections, especially for tattoos.


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PostPosted: Thu 12 Dec 2013 7:42 pm 
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I've looked it up on Lexilogos - in the (on-line) Fockleyr Manninag as Baarlagh compiled by John Kelly and William Gill - as you'd expect oig means young, oigan means a youth, and oikan means an infant, a babe - oikanagh - infantile, childish and oikanys means infancy, a state of childhood.


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PostPosted: Thu 12 Dec 2013 8:14 pm 
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Location: 91 - France
I always think of this CD when it's getting towards Christmas and it's 'Solas na Soilse' recorded by Finola Ó Siochrú
www.osiochru.com
and there's 'A Celtic Christmas' - Winter Ritual Song and Traditions from Brittany, Cornwall, Ireland, Isle of Man, Scotland and Wales - Saydisc CD-SDL 417 - if you can find it.
It includes Calennig, Tàladh Chriosda (also known as Tàladh ar Slànair), The Wren Hornpipe, Oikan Ayns Bethlehem (Baby in Bethlehem), Can Hela'r Dryw (Hunting the Wren), Shelg Y Dreann (Hunting the Wren), Kanomp Nouel, Mari Lwyd: Can y Fari Lwyd/Cariad Cywir (Processional Tune) Can Ffarwel, The Tree of Life (in Cornish) Carval ny drogh vraane - I hesitate it put this in here as it's an example of a Manx Carval criticising women but it was part of Christmas Eve celebrations - called Oie'll Voirrey, Plygain: Wel dyma'r botau gorau i gyd, Ffarwel Gwyr Aberffraw (there should be a ^ on the 'y' in Gwyr) and lastly from the Isle of Mull - Leanabh an àigh (Blessed Child) written by Mary MacDonald. The hymn was translated into English to become the well-known Christmas carol Child in a Manger. The tune, a traditional Scottish Hymn tune called Bunessan will be recognised by many as being that borrowed for Morning has Broken. If you want the words I can oblige, though I don't have all the appropriate accents for them.


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PostPosted: Thu 12 Dec 2013 9:22 pm 
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And while I'm about it, Litríocht have just sent me a message to know if I was interested in buying this -An Nollaig sa Naigín le CD


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PostPosted: Fri 13 Dec 2013 12:26 am 
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Tàladh Chriosda and Leanabh an àigh are both in my Christmas carol thread in the Gaelic section, a fhrainc. There is also an Irish version of Leanabh an àigh, listed as Leanbh sa mhainséar in one of the postings above in this thread. I wasn't sure whether the Gaelic song preceded "Morning has Broken", though, so thanks for that info.

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PostPosted: Fri 20 Dec 2013 1:42 am 
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Quote:
You cannot enforce a narrow ecclesiastical definition outside a narrow ecclesiastical context.

... or without a narrow mind :good:

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