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 Post subject: Re: Oíche shamhna!
PostPosted: Sat 13 Oct 2012 12:27 am 
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Bumping this, because I'd love to do a second article on Halloween terms in Irish: For instance:
Jack-o-lantern
Bobbing for apples (if there are other traditional games, I'd love to know about those as well)
...


I've emailed you two handouts I got in classes at some point with some of the terminology and activities.

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 Post subject: Re: Oíche shamhna!
PostPosted: Mon 15 Oct 2012 1:06 am 
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Location: Australia
Thank you for all this information. I find it so fascinating to see the different seasons and calendars. It helps make sense of other historical information I find, to know when the important celebrations were held.
We never celebrated Halloween in Australia when I was young, it is only a recent development picked up from American TV I think. We did have bonfires, but that was always on the Queens Birthday holiday weekend in June - we called it "cracker-night" because in those days we were allowed to buy fire crackers and let them off on that night to celebrate.
I had no idea that halloween actually began with the Irish New Year. All those things that I thought were American are actually from Ireland. I think it is a great compliment that the wonderful Pagan celebrations have been adopted, even if not recognised as such.
Does anyone know how the pumpkins come into, it or is that an American variation?


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 Post subject: Re: Oíche shamhna!
PostPosted: Mon 15 Oct 2012 1:44 am 
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Redwolf wrote:
Bumping this, because I'd love to do a second article on Halloween terms in Irish: For instance:

Jack-o-lantern

Bobbing for apples (if there are other traditional games, I'd love to know about those as well)

Any regional terms for what eventually morphed into treating (we've got a couple here, but are there more?)

I'll also have a look over at the other place to see if we had anything there we can bring over.

Redwolf


I remember reading somewhere that this "trick or treat" thing originated from the tradition of placing good food outside your door and letting the spirits or underworld creatures (originally the Tuath Dé Danann/ Aes Síd) eat it. Supposedly if you didn't do this then the creatures would play tricks on you.

For a regional flavour or difference here's a nós that was practiced in An Rinn until 40 years ago called: "The Night of the Horn" or "Oidhche na hadhairce". Discussed by Paddy Breathnach on Comhrá:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G00TIhTz7C0

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 Post subject: Re: Oíche shamhna!
PostPosted: Mon 15 Oct 2012 2:25 am 
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RosemaryR wrote:
Does anyone know how the pumpkins come into, it or is that an American variation?


Hi Rosemary welcome to the forum,

originally in Ireland and Scotland the pumpkin would have been a turnip or potato or cabbage (Scotland only), whereas, in England they were carved from beets. The "jack-o'-lantern" emerged from the Irish folktale of "stingy jack", like all folktales it has many regional variations:

From wikipedia, scroll down to tradition and folklore:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack-o'-lantern

And from the History Chanel:

http://www.history.com/topics/jack-olantern-history

The tale and tradition was brought to America, by Irish, Scottish and English emigrants, and there it was reinvented, like much of the other stuff associated with Hollowe'en. Its much easier to carve a pumpkin than it is a turnip or potato. .

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(Amhlaoibh Ó Súilleabháin)

Please wait for corrections/ more input from other forum members before acting on advice


I'm familiar with Munster Irish/ Gaolainn na Mumhan (GM) and the Official Standard/an Caighdeán Oifigiúil (CO)


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 Post subject: Re: Oíche shamhna!
PostPosted: Mon 15 Oct 2012 2:34 am 
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An Cionnfhaolach wrote:
For a regional flavour or difference here's a nós that was practiced in An Rinn until 40 years ago called: "The Night of the Horn" or "Oidhche na hadhairce". Discussed by Paddy Breathnach on Comhrá:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G00TIhTz7C0

:good: Is breá liom an clár sin "Comhrá". :D

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My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
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Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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 Post subject: Re: Oíche shamhna!
PostPosted: Mon 15 Oct 2012 2:54 am 
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This is off topic but I remember my mother used to carve a cross into a raw patato for Ash Wednesday. Then dip it in the blessed ashes. My Da would bring home ashes from Mass in a matchbox.

Sorry go back to Halloween. :darklaugh:

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 Post subject: Re: Oíche shamhna!
PostPosted: Mon 15 Oct 2012 3:14 am 
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Location: Santa Cruz Mountains, California, USA
CaoimhínSF wrote:
Quote:
Bumping this, because I'd love to do a second article on Halloween terms in Irish: For instance:
Jack-o-lantern
Bobbing for apples (if there are other traditional games, I'd love to know about those as well)
...


I've emailed you two handouts I got in classes at some point with some of the terminology and activities.


I haven't received them...did you use Audrey_Nickel(a)yahoo.com?

Thanks, btw!

Redwolf


Last edited by Breandán on Mon 15 Oct 2012 3:57 am, edited 1 time in total.
Hid e-mail address from spambots


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 Post subject: Re: Oíche shamhna!
PostPosted: Mon 15 Oct 2012 6:13 am 
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Quote:
I haven't received them...did you use Audrey_Nickel(a)yahoo.com?


Yes, I did. I just resent them, in any case. It seemed to go through and it's coming from my Yahoo address, so Yahoo ought to know whether it went through. Maybe I got put in your spam folder!

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 Post subject: Re: Oíche shamhna!
PostPosted: Tue 16 Oct 2012 1:00 am 
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Joined: Wed 14 Mar 2012 8:05 am
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Location: Australia
Thanks An Cionnfhaolach, for the info and links :D
I looked at the Oral history about the Night of the Horns also. What a great story, certainly had me giggling thinking about all the poor cursed housewives, what cheeky boys. :LOL:


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 Post subject: Re: Oíche shamhna!
PostPosted: Fri 19 Oct 2012 8:28 am 
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Location: Belfast, Ireland
This is a good thread. Halloween was my mum's birthday and she threw a party every Halloween and did all the cooking ! Being a big family, 13 of us, with our kids and spouses it became a local legend. Yes we did all the stuff mentioned earlier but we had a special game when we were younger. Mum put 3ds, sixpences and shillings in her pies and it was really exciting chomping away at the grub expecting a bonus. But the best laugh was the next day when you recovered the money from the toilet. I kid you not ! You were 'proper hard' if you could swallow the coins and then bring them into school as a trophy. :twisted:


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