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PostPosted: Sun 09 Dec 2012 11:35 am 
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séanas = diastema
Now, Bríd is teaching me new words in two languages! :LOL:

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PostPosted: Sun 09 Dec 2012 10:59 pm 
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Saoirse wrote:
séanas = diastema
Now, Bríd is teaching me new words in two languages! :LOL:

:darklaugh:

I bet you got the meaning from the photo anyhow. :D

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PostPosted: Tue 11 Dec 2012 10:20 am 
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Forget séanas. I need a soundfile to help me pronounce diastema. :LOL:

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PostPosted: Tue 11 Dec 2012 11:35 am 
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Mick wrote:
Forget séanas. I need a soundfile to help me pronounce diastema. :LOL:

:LOL: Me, too. :oops:



Don't want to put a damper on the party, but I think a diastema is technically a different type of gap between teeth from a séanas (the photo definitely represents a séanas).

A diastema is "A gap separating teeth of one kind from those of another, found in most mammals except humans." (SOED), i.e., the gap between the biting teeth and grinding teeth of horses, sheep, cows, etc.

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WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Tue 11 Dec 2012 8:23 pm 
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Breandán wrote:
Don't want to put a damper on the party, but I think a diastema is technically a different type of gap between teeth from a séanas (the photo definitely represents a séanas).

A diastema is "A gap separating teeth of one kind from those of another, found in most mammals except humans." (SOED), i.e., the gap between the biting teeth and grinding teeth of horses, sheep, cows, etc.

Well wikipedia says it applies to both humans and animals (but it's hard to know how reliable that is). There's some interesting superstitions about it too.

Quote:
In the Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer wrote of the "gap-toothed wife of Bath".[2] As early as this time period, the gap between the front teeth, especially in women, had been associated with lustful characteristics. Thus, the implication in describing "the gap-toothed wife of Bath" is that she is a middle-aged woman with insatiable lust. This has no scientific basis, but it has been a popular assumption in folklore since the Middle Ages.[citation needed]

In Ghana, Namibia, and Nigeria, diastema is regarded as being attractive and a sign of fertility, and some people have even had them created through cosmetic dentistry.[3] In France, they are called "dents du bonheur" ("lucky teeth"),[4] and in Australia, gapped front teeth in children are said to be a predictor of future wealth.

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PostPosted: Wed 12 Dec 2012 5:32 am 
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I believe there is folklore about it in Ireland too. But I don't remember the details.

Well that looks like it was an interesting word. :D

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PostPosted: Mon 14 Jan 2013 7:02 pm 
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Bríd Mhór wrote:
milleán = blame
Ná bí ag cur an mhilleán ormsa!
Úsáidim 'locht' in ionad milleán, but there's usually plenty of blame to go around in our house so useful to have multiple ways to express it! :mrgreen:

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PostPosted: Mon 14 Jan 2013 7:28 pm 
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Saoirse wrote:
Bríd Mhór wrote:
milleán = blame
Ná bí ag cur an mhilleán ormsa!
Úsáidim 'locht' in ionad milleán, but there's usually plenty of blame to go around in our house so useful to have multiple ways to express it! :mrgreen:



Yeah, you can use "locht" with the same meaning. :yes:

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It is recommended that you always wait for three to agree on a translation.
I speak Connemara Irish, and my input will often reflect that.
I will do an mp3 file on request for short translations.

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PostPosted: Mon 21 Jan 2013 7:18 pm 
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Focal an Lae inniu: crap = pull in / fold sail / shrink

I have heard, 'Crap suas do mhuinchillí.' for 'Pull up your sleeves.'

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PostPosted: Mon 21 Jan 2013 7:29 pm 
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Saoirse wrote:

I have heard, 'Crap suas do mhuinchillí.' for 'Pull up your sleeves.'


:yes:

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It is recommended that you always wait for three to agree on a translation.
I speak Connemara Irish, and my input will often reflect that.
I will do an mp3 file on request for short translations.

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