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PostPosted: Sun 14 Oct 2012 7:41 pm 
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Bríd Mhór wrote:
Very interesting.
I would understand "Do bhagair sé orm" as "he threatened me".

It can mean that as well in Munster, in fact it's the usual meaning, but it can indeed mean "to wink". It's
usually a teasing wink or a wink used as a silent signal. It's also used for a nod or hand gesture used as a signal.

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The dialect I use is Munster Irish, particularly Cork Irish, so words or phrases I use might not be correct for other areas.:D

Ar sgáth a chéile a mhairid na daoine, lag agus láidir, uasal is íseal


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PostPosted: Sun 14 Oct 2012 7:46 pm 
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It reminds me of the first time I heard the Ulsterism.
"Níl a bhuíochas ort". (meaning "thank you").
I thought it meant the opposite, that you aren't being shown gratitude. :LOL:

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It is recommended that you always wait for three to agree on a translation.
I speak Connemara Irish, and my input will often reflect that.
I will do an mp3 file on request for short translations.

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PostPosted: Sun 14 Oct 2012 8:06 pm 
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Bríd Mhór wrote:
It reminds me of the first time I heard the Ulsterism.
"Níl a bhuíochas ort". (meaning "thank you").
I thought it meant the opposite, that you aren't being shown gratitude. :LOL:

I think Níl a bhuíochas ort is more like "Don't mention it", but níl buíochas ar bith acu air does mean "they are not at all pleased with him" and níl aon bhuíochas acu ar a chéile means "they are not on friendly terms"/"there's no love lost between them". :darklaugh:

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WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Sun 14 Oct 2012 9:06 pm 
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"sop = dry grass stalk

Níl ann ach sop in áit na scuaibe. = It is only a whisp of hay instead of a brush (meaning - a poor substitute/makeshift)"

This is a great expression! Thanks a million for putting some of the words into sentences. It is extra hassle for you, but great to show us how to use them. Isn't a 'sop' also a drinking straw?

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Is foghlaimeoir mé. I am a learner. DEFINITELY wait for others to confirm and/or improve.
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PostPosted: Sun 14 Oct 2012 9:16 pm 
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Saoirse wrote:
"sop = dry grass stalk

Níl ann ach sop in áit na scuaibe. = It is only a whisp of hay instead of a brush (meaning - a poor substitute/makeshift)"

This is a great expression! Thanks a million for putting some of the words into sentences. It is extra hassle for you, but great to show us how to use them. Isn't a 'sop' also a drinking straw?


No hassle really. I'm glad they help.


sop = a drinking straw - I haven't heard that but it is a good word for it.

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It is recommended that you always wait for three to agree on a translation.
I speak Connemara Irish, and my input will often reflect that.
I will do an mp3 file on request for short translations.

___________________________________________________________


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PostPosted: Wed 21 Nov 2012 11:25 pm 
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Today's word 'tinn' has had an interesting consequence in our house. Our kids sometimes mix up 'sick' and 'sore' in English because the same word is used for both of them in Irish!

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PostPosted: Thu 22 Nov 2012 12:55 am 
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In Munster there's a difference between tinn (sore) and breoite (sick). I think it's just Connacht that uses tinn for both situations.

In Ulster, tinn means sick and they have another word for sore that I can't remember right now. I'm sure Lughaidh or someone will know the word I'm trying to think of.

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PostPosted: Sun 09 Dec 2012 12:25 am 
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With today's Focal an Lae, I almost expected Bríd to sing it! :lah:

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PostPosted: Sun 09 Dec 2012 12:27 am 
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Saoirse wrote:
With today's Focal an Lae, I almost expected Bríd to sing it! :lah:

:LOL: After a few of these :guiness: maybe.

_________________
___________________________________________________________

It is recommended that you always wait for three to agree on a translation.
I speak Connemara Irish, and my input will often reflect that.
I will do an mp3 file on request for short translations.

___________________________________________________________


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PostPosted: Sun 09 Dec 2012 11:27 am 
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Bríd Mhór wrote:
Saoirse wrote:
With today's Focal an Lae, I almost expected Bríd to sing it! :lah:

:LOL: After a few of these :guiness: maybe.
Now THAT would be a soundfile worth downloading and posting on YouTube with your new smiley dancing to it! viewtopic.php?f=28&t=1733
Bet it'd go viral!! :mrgreen:

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Beatha teanga í a labhairt.


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