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PostPosted: Sun 16 Jul 2017 8:37 pm 
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So this one isn't for me but rather for one of my students (I'm an ESL teacher).

She is looking to get a tattoo in Irish of something equivalent to:

'Water it so it grows healthy'

(The 'it' in this instance being a plant).

For fear that she would go with a less reliable resource I wanted to check with you folks here.

I can ask her for more specifics if the phrase doesn't make sense or needs more explaining. I'd also like to ask if there's a seanfhocal about watering plants that I could suggest to her instead, as it seems that the sentiment rather than the phrasing is more important to her.

Thanks in advance for any help you can offer and thanks also for the long-running generosity of this community. Táim an-bhuíoch díobh as bhur gcuidiú.


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PostPosted: Mon 17 Jul 2017 12:13 am 
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Gearóid wrote:
So this one isn't for me but rather for one of my students (I'm an ESL teacher).

She is looking to get a tattoo in Irish of something equivalent to:

'Water it so it grows healthy'

(The 'it' in this instance being a plant).

For fear that she would go with a less reliable resource I wanted to check with you folks here.

I can ask her for more specifics if the phrase doesn't make sense or needs more explaining. I'd also like to ask if there's a seanfhocal about watering plants that I could suggest to her instead, as it seems that the sentiment rather than the phrasing is more important to her.

Thanks in advance for any help you can offer and thanks also for the long-running generosity of this community. Táim an-bhuíoch díobh as bhur gcuidiú.


For a literal translation:
Cuir uisce air, i dtreo go bhfásfaidh sé.
Water it, so that it will grow.

If it's meant to be a poetic way to encourage nurturing young people as they grow up, there's this traditional proverb:
Mol an óige agus tiocfaidh [sí/siad].
Praise the young and they will blossom ["come along'].

I suppose you could combine the two and have:
Cuir uisce air, i dtreo go dtiocfaidh sé.
Water it, so that it will come along.

Edited to update it per the discussion below.

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I'm not a native (or entirely fluent) speaker, so be sure to wait for confirmations/corrections, especially for tattoos.


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PostPosted: Mon 17 Jul 2017 11:32 am 
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Joined: Tue 06 Sep 2011 8:09 pm
Posts: 906
CaoimhínSF wrote:
Gearóid wrote:
So this one isn't for me but rather for one of my students (I'm an ESL teacher).

She is looking to get a tattoo in Irish of something equivalent to:

'Water it so it grows healthy'

(The 'it' in this instance being a plant).

For fear that she would go with a less reliable resource I wanted to check with you folks here.

I can ask her for more specifics if the phrase doesn't make sense or needs more explaining. I'd also like to ask if there's a seanfhocal about watering plants that I could suggest to her instead, as it seems that the sentiment rather than the phrasing is more important to her.

Thanks in advance for any help you can offer and thanks also for the long-running generosity of this community. Táim an-bhuíoch díobh as bhur gcuidiú.


For a literal translation:
Cur uisce air, i dtreo go bhfásfadh sé.
Water it, so that it will grow.

If it's meant to be a poetic way to encourage nurturing young people as they grow up, there's this traditional proverb:
Mol an óige agus tiocfaidh [sí/siad].
Praise the young and they will blossom ["come along'].

I suppose you could combine the two and have:
Cur uisce air, i dtreo go dtiocfadh sé.
Water it, so that it will come along.


Cuir uisce air, i dtreo is go bhfásfaidh sé

Some spelling errors. I would say the "is" when using this construction, but it may not be necessary.


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PostPosted: Mon 17 Jul 2017 11:37 pm 
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Quote:
Cuir uisce air, i dtreo is go bhfásfaidh sé
Some spelling errors. I would say the "is" when using this construction, but it may not be necessary.


Yes, I misspell cuir a lot (and am a bad typist, even when I try to get it right).
FGB indicates the use of the conditional after "i dtreo go", as I did, and omits the "is". Maybe it's a dialectical thing.

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I'm not a native (or entirely fluent) speaker, so be sure to wait for confirmations/corrections, especially for tattoos.


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PostPosted: Tue 18 Jul 2017 2:18 pm 
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Posts: 906
CaoimhínSF wrote:
Quote:
Cuir uisce air, i dtreo is go bhfásfaidh sé
Some spelling errors. I would say the "is" when using this construction, but it may not be necessary.


Yes, I misspell cuir a lot (and am a bad typist, even when I try to get it right).
FGB indicates the use of the conditional after "i dtreo go", as I did, and omits the "is". Maybe it's a dialectical thing.

My mistake, I just checked. The is is optional (I thought it was necessary as I say it all the time myself :P).

I hadn't considered that the conditional could be used. From what I can see both are fine, so it just down to what the desired meaning is.

In this case the conditional would work fine. :good:

Wait for more input to be sure.


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PostPosted: Tue 18 Jul 2017 4:29 pm 
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I'd use conditional with past tenses in the main clause:
Chuir mé uisce air i dtreo's go bhfásfadh sé.
But I'd use future tense with other tenses (incl. imperative) in the main clause:
Cuir uisce air i dtreo's go bhfásfaidh sé.


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PostPosted: Tue 18 Jul 2017 8:33 pm 
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Posts: 906
Labhrás wrote:
I'd use conditional with past tenses in the main clause:
Chuir mé uisce air i dtreo's go bhfásfadh sé.
But I'd use future tense with other tenses (incl. imperative) in the main clause:
Cuir uisce air i dtreo's go bhfásfaidh sé.

That makes sense. I often go off what I say in speech, so oftentimes the concept isn't formalised properly in my head, and minor issues like this can occur in writing.

GRMA


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PostPosted: Tue 18 Jul 2017 8:59 pm 
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Gumbi wrote:
Labhrás wrote:
I'd use conditional with past tenses in the main clause:
Chuir mé uisce air i dtreo's go bhfásfadh sé.
But I'd use future tense with other tenses (incl. imperative) in the main clause:
Cuir uisce air i dtreo's go bhfásfaidh sé.

That makes sense. I often go off what I say in speech, so oftentimes the concept isn't formalised properly in my head, and minor issues like this can occur in writing.

GRMA

Yes, I see the distinction, and that does make sense so I'll update my original entry.

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I'm not a native (or entirely fluent) speaker, so be sure to wait for confirmations/corrections, especially for tattoos.


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PostPosted: Fri 21 Jul 2017 4:33 pm 
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CaoimhínSF wrote:
Mol an óige agus tiocfaidh [sí/siad].


Perhaps I am mistaken, but I cannot perceive how it could be correct to have "siad" in this phrase. I understand the idiom as Mol an óige agus tiocfaidh [an óige], in which the refers to the antecedent an óige rather than to a person

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PostPosted: Fri 21 Jul 2017 5:19 pm 
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Location: Santa Cruz Mountains, California, USA
Cúmhaí wrote:
CaoimhínSF wrote:
Mol an óige agus tiocfaidh [sí/siad].


Perhaps I am mistaken, but I cannot perceive how it could be correct to have "siad" in this phrase. I understand the idiom as Mol an óige agus tiocfaidh [an óige], in which the refers to the antecedent an óige rather than to a person


I agree. Perhaps it's clearer if "an óige" is translated as "youth" rather than "the young"...makes it clearer that it's meant to be singular.

Redwolf


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